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The Last Notes

"El Toblerone" of Almería in demolition

The Toblerone de Almería was built in the 70s as part of the mining progress that the province manifested, a moment that the big newspapers described as an “unquestionable aesthetic and urban improvement.” Its historical, patrimonial and sentimental value has been assimilated by a great number of people who remember it as a great element of their childhood known as "El Toblerone" for its structure similar to that of the famous chocolate bar.

New species of reptile from 23 million years ago

New species of reptile from 23 million years ago

Mexican scientists are studying a small lizard that lived 23 million years ago and that, thanks to being trapped in amber, is still preserved in a complete state and with remains of its soft skin.This piece was found in the Simojovel sites, located north of the southeastern state of Chiapas, several months ago.

Ruins in Peru victims of illegal activities

Ruins in Peru victims of illegal activities

Since 1990 the pre-Inca ruins of the Yanamarca archaeological complex have been considered Cultural Heritage of the Nation. The complex corresponds to the Chanca culture and the buildings consist of three floors whose walls have been damaged by illegal mining activities.The Chanca culture was peacefully incorporated into the Incas from the Late Intermediate period, that is, from the year 1400 before Christ.

Pompeii will remain a World Heritage Site

Pompeii will remain a World Heritage Site

Yesterday, the president of the Italian Commission for UNESCO (Giovanni Puglisi), affirmed that the recognition of Pompeii as a World Heritage Site is not in danger, these statements emerged after a meeting with representatives of Culture of the Italian Parliament , where he stated, after visiting Pompeii, that "the procedure that would have had to lead to that result (the exclusion from the list) has not even begun."

Historic Cities: Chersonesus, the colony destroyed 2300 years ago

Historic Cities: Chersonesus, the colony destroyed 2300 years ago

In the southwestern part of the Crimean peninsula is Chersonesus an ancient Greek colony that was founded around 2,500 years ago by settlers from Heraclea Pontica. The place is in good condition with houses dating from 300 BC in the form of visible ruins that have allowed us to know what the daily life of those who lived there was like.

52,000-year-old jungle under the waters of the Gulf of Mexico

52,000-year-old jungle under the waters of the Gulf of Mexico

Under the waters of the Gulf of Mexico is a virgin forest that nature has preserved for more than 50,000 years. Buried for centuries under oceanic sediments, in 2005 the great Hurricane Katrina shed light on this part of nature discovered in 2012 and recently released to the public.

A Jewish temple in Ancient Egypt

A Jewish temple in Ancient Egypt

Driven by the publication in 1911 of papyrus documents containing histories of a Jewish military colony from the 5th century BC, different expeditions of German, French and Italian origin have been carried out to investigate the lower reaches of Elephantine Island, located in the Nile River, but they were unsuccessful.

Burgh records have been included in the UNESCO list

Burgh records have been included in the UNESCO list

The Old Aberdeen Burgh Collection has been included in the list of books of world importance in Great Britain. Eight volumes represent the oldest and most complete Burgh records written in Old Latin and Scottish and dating from 1398 to 1509 The collection, now in the hands of the Abeerden City and Abeerdenshire Archives, is the only surviving record in Scotland from the 14th century and, in line with the UNESCO World Program, it has been chosen to become part of the Heritage Important documentary.

50-million-year-old fossils discovered in Australia

50-million-year-old fossils discovered in Australia

While construction was underway, workers discovered a strange urban treasure of a crocodile and other fossils that appear to be 50 million years old.During excavations near Brisbane Geebung train station, 15 meters deep they located fossils trapped in a layer of shale oil.

5,000-year-old find in Scotland

5,000-year-old find in Scotland

Nick Card, director of the Orkney center excavation between the Ring of Brodgar and the Strenness Stones, highlighted the importance of the latest discovery in the area, a Neolithic stone, as it is decorated on both sides with deep inscriptions. from the Orkney Archaeological Research Center at the University of Hihglands and The Islands, impressed that it is the highest quality piece found in the entire site and in the UK.

New excavations to find a kingdom of the Picts

New excavations to find a kingdom of the Picts

Archaeologists plan to increase excavations to find one of the lost kingdoms of the ancient Picts, a tribe of legendary warriors whose empire stretched from Fife to the Moray Firth, before their mysterious disappearance. Until recently, historians believed that Fortriu, a One of the most powerful kingdoms of "the painted people" was in Petrhshire.

Pre-Ashoka temple discovered in Lumbini

Pre-Ashoka temple discovered in Lumbini

Recent excavations in the Maya Devi temple grounds in Lumbini have brought to light the remains of a people dating back more than 1,000 years before Emperor Ashoka built monuments for the spread of Buddhism. Until now the most Buddhist temples Ancient ones had been attributed to Ashoka, but the recent discovery of a chapel on a wooden structure has revealed a previously built temple.

The laser will restore its color to the Villa of the Mysteries of Pompeii

The laser will restore its color to the Villa of the Mysteries of Pompeii

A new laser-based technology is expected to restore the frescoes located in the Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii to their original splendor. These frescoes are considered one of the most surprising ancient remains found in the city, buried by a volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

Alcohol and drugs in sacrificed Inca children

Alcohol and drugs in sacrificed Inca children

Scientists have discovered that drugs and alcohol were essential in the months before the children died in the sacrifices. A teenager has been analyzed and it has been found that she was sedated before her death. The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Non-invasive geophysical techniques to study the Pakal crypt

Non-invasive geophysical techniques to study the Pakal crypt

From advanced non-intrusive geophysical techniques, more information about the Pakal crypt is discovered. There are anomalies corresponding to two cavities of two and three meters respectively detected by a georadar on the facade of the Temple of Inscriptions in Palenque, and the confirmation that the Pakal crypt does not lie on rock.

Bahrain's history emerges from the ground

Bahrain's history emerges from the ground

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun's merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, benchmarks of commerce and culture before the rise of the Ottoman or Persian empires. For a millennium, the Dilmun civilization was dedicated to the pearl trade copper, activity that lasted until South Asia vanished from the earth.

Archaeologists examine Byzantine garbage dumps

Archaeologists examine Byzantine garbage dumps

Several finds from the late Byzantine period (5th-7th centuries AD) were among the antiquities discovered in excavations of agricultural lands in the ancient city of Apollonia-Arsuf, east of the site. Among the finds are wine-making facilities, which could be the remains of an olive press, as well as the remains of a wall, part of a building intended for farmers.

Crusade hospital found in Jerusalem

Crusade hospital found in Jerusalem

The Israel Antiquities Authority in association with the East Jerusalem Grand Bazaar Company has discovered part of a hospital from the Crusade era (1099-1291 AD). The building belonged to the Waqf and is located in the center of the Quarter. Christian in the ancient city of Jerusalem, in the region known as "Muristan."

Mercury to cure diseases in the Middle Ages

Mercury to cure diseases in the Middle Ages

A new technology proves that doses of mercury were delivered to the sick. This happened to a boy between 10 and 13 years old buried in the medieval town of Ribe in Denmark 800 years ago. His death was agonizing due to the doses of mercury supplied in order to cure the disease. According to a new technology developed by chemist Kaare Lund Rasmussen of the University of Southern Denmark, details can be obtained about the moments before death. of a person.

Archaeogenetics to study the migrations of prehistoric man to Europe

Archaeogenetics to study the migrations of prehistoric man to Europe

Professor Richards of the University of Huddersfield has played a key role in answering one of the most important questions in human history: What route did humans take when they dispersed 60,000 years ago? The teacher is a pioneering researcher in the field of archaeogenetics around the world.