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The Last Notes

A ritual mask from the 2nd century discovered in Japan

A ritual mask from the 2nd century discovered in Japan

A fragment of a mask used for cultural events between western Japan and China has recently been discovered. According to the Sakurai City Board of Education, the mask was unearthed at the Daifuku archaeological site dating back to the second half of the 2nd century, making it the oldest mask ever found in Japan.

Daily life in ancient times through graffiti

Daily life in ancient times through graffiti

Graffiti is not a modern phenomenon but it is as old as humanity, maintaining a history from 3,000 years ago, almost as long as the writing itself.The first sample of graffiti was written in Greek and dated from the 8th century BC, it was found in a tomb of Pithicoussae in Italy and is known as "the cup of Nestor".

Excavations return to Sevastopolis

Excavations return to Sevastopolis

In the ancient city of Sevastopolis, in the central province of Anatolia (Turkey), archaeological excavations are to be restarted after 22 years. Sevastopolis is one of the most well-known important cities of the Black Sea being the capital many times in the past. Despite being considered as a “second Ephesus”, due to the lack of interest and technical problems the excavations that were carried out in between 1987 and 1991 were not enough and with the time that has passed it is in a detrimental situation for the protection of its pieces, so now every possible effort is being made so that the excavations begin soon.

European Archaeological Project of Music

European Archaeological Project of Music

The European Archaeological Project of Music has just been financed through the EU Culture Program with a budget of two million euros and eight partners from different countries participate in it. The project will develop a multimedia exhibition accompanied by workshops and performances It will visit ten centers from a total of eight countries between the dates of May 2015 until November 2016.

Friends of History express their concern about the Roman sewers

Friends of History express their concern about the Roman sewers

The cultural association Friends of the History of Calahorra has recently issued a statement in which it expresses its concern about the Roman sewers located on Calle San Andrés, since one of the buildings that give access to them will soon collapse. Seven years, from 1995 to 2002, these sewers were opened to the public at no cost to allow citizens to discover the vestiges of the ancient Roman city thanks to the collaboration of Moisés Arnaiz who owned access to that part of the sewers.

An unknown structure found under the Sea of ​​Galilee

An unknown structure found under the Sea of ​​Galilee

In the depths of the Sea of ​​Galilee, researchers from Tel Aviv University have discovered a cone-shaped structure that could have been built on land some 6,000 years ago. The object is 230 meters in diameter, 39 meters high and has a 60,000 tons of weight as reported by Shmulik Marco, belonging to the Department of Geophysics of the UTA.

Dinosaur bones found in Australia

Dinosaur bones found in Australia

In Queensland, Australia, a cemetery containing bones belonging to dinosaurs has recently been discovered. David Elliott has commented that no bones of these characteristics have been seen in a decade. In this case, they have not had to dig excessively to find the bone deposit, a fact that distinguishes it from other previous investigations.

Colonial and Toltec remains found in Mexico

Colonial and Toltec remains found in Mexico

In the atrium of the Cathedral of San José, in Tula, remains of Toltec buildings and Mexican occupations from about 900 or 1000 years after Christ have been found. In addition to these, remains of colonial vestiges from the first half of the 16th century have also been found.With the support of the National Institute of Anthropology and History and the diocese of Tula, the American archaeologist Shannon Dugan found the remains as part of a research on the first Franciscan places in the region.

Cyprus, a majestic island

Cyprus, a majestic island

There are a lot of islands in the Mediterranean Sea but only one is the birthplace of the famous Greek goddess of love called Aphrodite and that is Cyprus. At 3,572 miles Cyprus is the largest island in the Mediterranean and is a destination where visitors can enjoy a mild climate with 340 days of sunshine a year.

2,500-year-old tombs of warriors discovered in Serbia

2,500-year-old tombs of warriors discovered in Serbia

Skeletons with spears and daggers belonging to ancient warriors have been found in southeastern Serbia during the construction of a road project. Found in the Pirot neighborhood belonging to an ancient Roman road called Via Militaris, they date back about 2,500 years. In addition to spears and daggers, among the skeletal remains were several bronze objects used as ornaments or decorations, so with the amount From the data accumulated in this site, it can be said that it deserves great attention due to its importance for the history of our past.

View of the ancient Kastro of Kallithea

View of the ancient Kastro of Kallithea

In September 2010, the archaeological exhibition “Viewing a City-The Ancient Kastro of Kallithea” was shown for the first time at the University of Alberta (Canada). In the past year, after the municipality of Farsalia and the University worked together, the material was transferred to the municipality to carry out a permanent exhibition.

Video of the assassination of John F. Kennedy

Video of the assassination of John F. Kennedy

The document that is shaking the Internet today is neither more nor less than the complete video of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Here we leave it to you: After studying History at the University and after many previous tests, Red Historia was born, a project that emerged as a means of dissemination where to find the most important news of archeology, history and humanities, as well as articles of interest, curiosities and much more.

The Iberian site of Vilars d’Arbeca, rich in finds

The Iberian site of Vilars d’Arbeca, rich in finds

The Prehistoric Research Group (GIP) of the University of Lleida (UdL) is finding numerous archaeological remains in the Iberian site of the Vilars de Arbeca (Lleida). Among the finds are a fibula, a bronze bracelet, fragments of wood , ceramics and animal bones which through their study will give information about the moment in which the town was abandoned.

Leptis Magna in the spotlight

Leptis Magna in the spotlight

One of the most important cities of the Roman Empire, Leptis Magna, is today surprisingly one of the best preserved archaeological sites. Because the cities of Carthage and Palmyra outnumber it in size and scope, Leptis Magna may have remained hidden from the general public.

1,000-year-old Shiva temple saved from demolition

1,000-year-old Shiva temple saved from demolition

The National Highway Authority of India has finally decided not to destroy part of a 1,000-year-old temple, thus rectifying what had been established at first to be able to carry out a road expansion project. It is located in the village of Manampadi near Kumbakonam and was declared, 30 years ago by the State Department of Archeology, a protected monument.

Napoleon's death mask up for auction

Napoleon's death mask up for auction

Did you know that the great and eternal French myth has a death mask? One of these two masks that have been cataloged as originals, was in private hands until Wednesday the 19th it was sold for £ 169,250 (198,000 euros) in: Books, Maps and Manuscripts of Bomhams, England. Still, it is unknown who the buyer is.

New excavation around the tomb of Richard III

New excavation around the tomb of Richard III

The place where the body of Richard III was found will be, for a month, the excavation area where archaeologists will try to find more clues about the medieval convent initially found.The work will be carried out by a team from the University of Leicester who intend to find more details about the burial of Richard III, about the architecture of the church, remains of a group of friars beheaded by Henry IV in the fifteenth century and even a medieval knight who may have been the mayor of Leicester.

Transformation of the Teotihuacán Valley

Transformation of the Teotihuacán Valley

The Teotihuacán Valley, located in the State of Mexico, has experienced climatic changes in recent centuries that have produced a total transformation of its flora and fauna, in many cases causing species to disappear, thanks to the analysis of archaeozoological collections. Extracted from the area, it has been possible to observe that from the year 1500 a great decrease in wild species began to occur, surviving only those species that were able to adapt to the great changes, such as the opossum.

Agricultural activity in Judea was born 9000 years ago

Agricultural activity in Judea was born 9000 years ago

Excavations carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority prior to the laying of pipes have brought to light evidence that agricultural activity began in Esthaol 9,000 years ago, including pottery, stone and flint tools. which indicate that the first to populate the place arrived there 9000 years ago, a period that is called the Pre-Ceramic Neolithic.

Roman tomb found at Delphi

Roman tomb found at Delphi

Under the Tsoúka hill near the Stromi settlement in Phocida, a tomb chamber has been discovered by chance. Although the tomb has been altered, a study carried out on skeleton remains has shown in its result that at least they were carried three burials in this place during Roman times, between the 1st centuries BC.