OT-133 Flamethrower Tank

OT-133 Flamethrower Tank

OT-133 Flamethrower Tank

The OT-133 was the third of a series of flame thrower tanks based on the T-26 light tank, and was built around the improved T-26S. The OT-133 carried the same Model 1938 flame thrower as the OT-130, which gave it a normal range of 45-50 metres. The turret of the T-26S was moved to the right to make space for more fuel tanks in the hull. Like the OT-130 the OT-133 was used during the Winter War against Finland, where the short range of the flame thrower and the lack of any other armament made it very vulnerable.


Flame tank

A flame tank is a type of tank equipped with a flamethrower, most commonly used to supplement combined arms attacks against fortifications, confined spaces, or other obstacles. The type only reached significant use in the Second World War, during which the United States, Soviet Union, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom (including members of the British Commonwealth) all produced flamethrower-equipped tanks.

A number of production methods were used. The flamethrowers used were either modified versions of existing infantry flame weapons (Flammpanzer I and II) or specially designed (Flammpanzer III). They were mounted externally (Flammpanzer II), replaced existing machine gun mounts, or replaced the tank's main armament (Flammpanzer III). Fuel for the flame weapon was either carried inside the tank, in armoured external storage, or in some cases in a special trailer behind the tank (Churchill Crocodile).


Contents

This section's factual accuracy is disputed. (August 2011)


Flame tanks did not suffer from the same vulnerability as man-portable flamethrowers, carried much more fuel, and fired longer-ranged flame bursts. They were invaluable for rooting out heavy infantry fortifications. As no US tank cannon could possibly penetrate the thick bunkers [ 1 ] created by the Japanese defenders on islands such as Tarawa or Iwo Jima, flame throwing tanks were utilized instead, while infantrymen provided the necessary security during their deployment.

In an open battlefield, the flamethrower was virtually useless because of its short range.

Experience of combat use of flamethrower tanks was mixed. German flamethrower variants of Panzer II and Panzer III were both discontinued due to unsatisfactory performance and converted into assault guns or tank destroyers. The Panzer IV was never converted into a flame variant, despite being used for just about every purpose imaginable on the battlefield.

The mixed results were in part due to the development of infantry anti-tank weapons. At the start of the Second World War most infantry units had weapons with some effectiveness against armoured targets at ranges of thirty to fifty meters, like anti-tank rifles. Towards the end of the war, more powerful anti-tank weapons such as the bazooka, Panzerschreck, and PIAT were introduced which were fatal to tanks at ranges longer than the tank's flamethrower could reach.

While the British used a squadron of Churchill Crocodiles during the fighting at Brest in September 1944, the US Army received a smaller American designed flamethrower mounted upon the M4 Sherman tank during the same month. Assigned to the US Army's 70th Tank Battalion, the flamethrowing tanks went into action on 18 September 1944, where it was found that the weapons had a very short range as compared to the British Crocodiles, and consequently were not very popular amongst US troops. [ 2 ]

The Canadian and Dutch [ citation needed ] armies became one of the most active users of the Wasp flamethrowers while fighting in Europe, finding the weapons to be extremely effective in prying German soldiers from their defenses. Indeed, the mechanical flamethrowers, although not impressive by themselves, struck horror into the minds of German troops, who feared them more than any other conventional weapon. [ 3 ]

Crews of 'flame' tanks were not necessarily more vulnerable than those crews in the regular, standard version of the tank (a Churchill 'Crocodile' flame tank being more or less just as vulnerable to anti-tank weapons as the standard Churchill), the crews of flamethrowing tanks were often treated differently should they be captured alive by enemy troops. Due to the perceived inhumanity of the weapon itself, captured crews of such tanks were often treated much less humanely than crews of regular tanks. Instances of 'flametankers' being executed by the opposite troops upon capture were not uncommon. [ citation needed ]

Flame tanks were not necessarily more prone to catching fire. Tanks such as the Churchill 'Crocodile', which towed the liquid container behind the actual tank held no greater risk of fire than standard tanks. [ citation needed ]


The M5 Satan Flamethrowing Tank, Doing What it Does Best – Throwing Flames! (Watch)

The M5 Stuart tank was a light tank and one that was utilized as a battle tank in the Pacific for a lot longer than in other areas. It was considered to be much better than the Ha-go light tank (Japanese Type 95). And the Chi-ha medium tank (Type 97) might have had a more powerful gun (47mm), but its armor was much thinner, at its thickest 25mm, so the M tanks (M5 and M5A1) could easily be matched with it.

The M5 tanks were kitted out with Ronson Ronson flamethrowers these replaced the main guns that were usually on there. In 1943 the US Marine Corps managed to get 20 of these converted tanks, complete with flamethrowers. They were super effective against the Japanese and their strongholds which were usually difficult for the advancing Marines to get past.

Crews that manned these tanks of flame were treated quite differently than other tank crew members if they happened to be captured by enemy troops. Their treatment was far less inhumane than other’s treatment, mainly as these tanks were considered to be ‘inhumane.’ It was not unusual for the crew of flame tanks to be executed immediately upon capture by the enemy troops.

Flame tanks also drew immediate fire upon itself wherever it went, as well as troops armed with flamethrowers this was due to the fear the weapon had upon the enemy.

The tank in this video is an ultra rare recreation of the Satan Tank, it is quite an infamous vehicle, and it tours around America on the show circuit.


Contents

Flame tanks did not suffer from the same vulnerability as man-portable flamethrowers, carried much more fuel, and fired longer-ranged flame bursts. Further, they were often well supported by infantry, such as in Iwo Jima, when massed Japanese attacks against the flame tanks were repelled by rifle fire.

However, in an open battlefield, the flamethrower was virtually useless because of its short range.

Experience of combat use of flamethrower tanks was mixed. German flamethrower variants of Panzer II and Panzer III were both discontinued due to unsatisfactory performance and converted into assault guns or tank destroyers. The Panzer IV was never converted into a flame variant, despite being used for just about every purpose imaginable on the battlefield.

The mixed results were in part due to the development of infantry anti-tank weapons. At the start of the Second World War most infantry units had weapons with some effectiveness against armoured targets at ranges of thirty to fifty metres, like anti-tank rifles. Towards the end of the war, more powerful anti-tank weapons such as the bazooka, Panzerschreck, and PIAT were introduced which were fatal to tanks at ranges longer than the tank's flamethrower could reach.

The effectiveness of a tank's flamethrower against an enemy tank was in question. [citation needed] If two tanks were to find themselves dozens of meters apart (i.e in the flamethrower's range), and both of their main guns weren't working, a flamethrower in place of the hull machine gun could, in theory and only at that point in time, be advantageous. Whilst the hull machine gun is of almost no use at all against an enemy tank, a flamethrower could, be made to cause the crew of the enemy tank to bail out. However, several things need to be considered, not the least of which the rarity of such a situations. First of all, the very likelihood of such a scenario, where main guns on both tanks are out of order and the tanks are close enough for the flamethrower to be of any use is very unlikely. As the war progressed it was exceedingly rare to come across lone tanks, which wouldn't be supported by infantry or other tanks or, usually, both. Secondly, a flamethrower can be seen from great distances, and attracts enemy attention. Lastly, it is presumed [by whom?] that if the tank has run out of main caliber ammunition it might, by that point, also not have enough petroleum jelly (or whatever the flamethrower's ammunition happened to be) to raise the temperature inside the enemy vehicle high enough to leave that vehicle's crew with no choice but to abandon it.

While crews of 'flame' tanks were not necessarily more vulnerable than those crews in the regular, standard version of the tank (a Churchill 'Crocodile' flame tank being more or less just as vulnerable to anti-tank weapons as the standard Churchill), the crews of flamethrowing tanks were often treated differently should they be captured alive by enemy troops. Because of the relative inhumanity of the weapon itself, captured crews of such tanks were often treated much less humanely than crews of regular tanks. Instances of Allied 'flametankers' being executed by German troops upon capture were not uncommon.

Additionally, flame tanks were not necessarily more prone to catching fire. Tanks such as the Churchill 'Crocodile', which towed the liquid container behind the actual tank held no greater risk of fire than standard tanks.


Other variants

The main variants were a tank-hunter equipped with a Boys 13.9 mm (0.55 in) rifle, replacing the original Bren gun, which was often relocated to an anti-air mount
There was a heavy machine gun version equipped with the .303 (7.7 mm) Vickers machine-gun, also replacing the forward Bren gun.
There was also a flame-thrower version, where a pipe exhaust replaced the Bren, called the Wasp, and carrying the “Ronson Flamethrower, Transportable, No 2”. The Canadian-built ones were named Wasp Mk.IIC.
A gun version was developed especially for the Homeguards, armed with a Smith 8pdr mounted in a large sponson at the front.
A prototype of the strange “Praying Mantis” was also built and tested in 1943. This very low-profile vehicle was designed to fire from above walls or hedgerows.


Flamethrower

The Flamethrower is a ranged weapon which uses Hydrogen gas as its fuel. It is fairly effective against mobs as it deals damage when they are directly hit with the stream and sets them on fire. It is most effective on large groups of mobs, where the user can hose down the entire group with fuel at a short distance.

Modes

You can switch between three fire modes using Shift + Item Mode (default M). The modes are

  • Combat - The default mode. Damages mobs and sets them on fire. Destroys any items on the ground. Does not set fire to blocks nor damage them.
  • Heat - Same as combat, but blocks/items that have a smelter recipe will be instantly converted into it. For example you can fire a short burst at iron ore block and a single ingot of iron will be dropped. 1
  • Inferno - Same as combat, but blocks that the stream hits will be hit with blast damage (like with creepers, ghasts, TNT) and will usually be destroyed. Nearby blocks will be set on fire.

1 Items that can be cooked multiple times are usually in their final form. For example, the Big Reactors mod has a smelter recipe for charcoal that cooks them into a graphite bar. So, if you fire a Heat stream at a log you'll likely end up with the graphite bar instead of the charcoal.


Contents

Cablecuffs

Cable cuffs are makeshift handcuffs. They are easier to break out of, and wirecutters will remove them instantly, but otherwise they still function as normal handcuffs. You need at least 15 coils.

Spear

The spear is a makeshift melee weapon which can only be held in hand or on your back. It does 10 brute when wielded with one hand, and 18 brute when wielded in both hands. Press z to wield with both hands. You can impale a decapitated head on the spear, and display it for all to see. However, this essentially nullifies the spear as a weapon. (you can just make another one, but, eh. )

Explosive Lance

The explosive lance is a simple spear, which when striking someone in melee with it while wielding it with both hands, activates the grenade attached to it on the target's tile. Does not explode from being thrown. With the right chemical mix this is an effective and makeshift way of permanently taking care of a Wizard.

Requires
1 x , 15 x , 1x , 1x Any grenade or C4/X4

Stunprod

The Stunprod is a makeshift Stun Baton which consumes much more battery life, and is much, much bulkier, which means that it can't be stored in backpacks (it will only fit on your back slot, and in the armor slot of certain bodywear). Expect to get thrown in the brig if caught with this weapon by Security. It is possible to recharge a Stunprod after depleting its power supply by using a Screwdriver on the prod to remove the Power Cell and either replacing it with a fresh cell or putting the dead cell in a Cell Charger. Rechargers are also surprisingly compatible with Stunprods.

While the Stunprod is great for self-defence, it deals almost no damage.

Note that basic power cells can't be inserted into a stunprod. You'll be told that you need a higher-capacity cell for them.

Similarly to the Stun Baton, hitting someone with it will result in 50 instant stamina damage, and then a 5 second knockdown 2 seconds after the hit. Has a 2.5 second cooldown between knockdown hits.

Requires
1 x , 1 x , 15 x , 1x

Teleprod

The Teleprod is similar to the Stunprod, but instead of just stunning the target, it also teleports the target a short distance away. Hopefully it sends the target straight off into deep-space.

Requires
1 x , 1 x , 15 x , 1x

Strobe Shield

A standard issue security riot shield, but it has a built in flash with the ability to blind and disorient the target.

Chainsaw

The Chainsaw is a glorified version of the circular saw, with extra robustness. You can even surgically replace your arms with chainsaws, if you would like your dream about the unstoppable Double Chainsaw Griffon Man to come true. They can be crafted using a circular saw, a plasteel sheet, some cable coil, and a welding tool. Don't forget to turn it on!

Improvised Explosive Device (IED)

The IED is a firebomb made out of a soda can. It is weak but it can do lots of damage if used correctly, from setting fire to crew to breaking power wires. It has a random timer between 0 and 8 seconds, so use it wisely!

Requires
1 x soda can, 1 x , 50u Welding Fuel, 1 x

Molotov Cocktail

Bash it on your target, watch him burst into flames. Highly recommended for rioters and revolutionaries alike. Light and toss. Fwooosh.

Flamethrower

The flamethrower creates a stream of flame that superheats the air and causes those caught in the flame to catch on fire. It has a range of about three tiles and is most effective against alien weeds and space vines while very effective against the aforementioned two infestations, the flamer is at best a suppression weapon against human targets and at worst a suicide attack to yourself. You are better off using a Stun Prod or a Toolbox to do direct damage, however the flamethrower is great for area denial, AoE attacks, and damage done over time (both from catching on fire and the hot state that it leaves the surrounding air in). When using a flamethrower either wear a Firesuit to protect you against the high heat or move back as soon as you fire the weapon.

May simply cause masses of plasma to be spewed everywhere if the pressure settings are too high.

Also, keep in mind that the tank can contain anything - from a burnmix over N20 to supercooled water vapor.

Requires
1 x , , 1 x , 1 x , 1 x

You can also get one from a hacked Autolathe, minus the plasma tank.

It should also be noted that the fuel inside the plasma tank determines the properties of the shot flame. Mixes of plasma and other gases can create different results when using the flamethrower, namely in temperature.

Improvised Shotgun

Essentially a tube that aims shotgun shells.

Requires
1 x , 1 x , 1 x , 1 x ,

Improvised Shotgun Shell

An improvised, short range buckshot shell.

Requires
10u Welding Fuel, 2x Metal Sheet, 1x Cable Piece,

Advanced Shotgun Shells

Some special shotgun shells can be crafted from Unloaded Technological Shells, which are printable from some techfabs/protolathes after research. Look here for the recipes.

Improvised Pneumatic Cannon

A unique gas-powered gun that can fire anything loaded into it. Can be loaded with 10 tiny items or equivalent. It fires one item at a time.

Comes with three pressure settings, which increase the amount of gas, throw speed and range of items loaded into it. The third setting knocks the user down.

In practice, the cannon is best used with items that embed and hurt when thrown - such as combat knives, survival knives, bone daggers, eswords/edaggers and throwing stars.

Bola

A simple device fashioned from a cable and weights on the end, designed to entangle enemies by wrapping around their legs upon being thrown at them. The victim can remove them rather quickly, however.

Extendo-Hand

Lets you reach things that are 2 tiles away and interact with them as if you were using your bare hand on them. Too long and awkward to use on things that are adjacent to you though. Basically you can fistfight/disarm people from a tile away assuming they don't close the distance or anything, plus you can unlock lockers or open doors from a tile away and stuff.

Baseball Bat

The baseball bat does moderate damage and knocks back mobs.

Liz O' Nine Tails

For displaying your dominance over those filthy lizards.

Cat O' Nine Tails

For displaying your dominance over those filthy catgirls.

Singletank Bomb

Singletank bombs are, unlike TTV bombs, constructed from a singular tank. As a result, they tend towards less explosive power but make up for it by being very easy to create in comparison. Experiment with gas mixtures.

Requires
1x , 1x detonator of your choice, 1x,

Chemical Payload

Two Grenade casings and a piece of C4 or Gibtonite are stuffed into a matter bin. The finished payload can then be loaded with 2-7 beakers. If you used large grenade casings you get room for one extra beaker each, and a higher quality matter bin increases this number by 1 per tier, up to the maximum of 7.

You should ideally place the payload into a bomb assembly (crafted from 10 plasteel) to provide a way to actually detonate it. Merge the wires of the bomb assembly with a wirecutter before finishing or the bomb will give an error when trying to activate it. Finish the assembly by closing it with a screwdriver. You can now drag it and activate it to set a timer. If the bomb is wrenched down and its timer is ticking, it cannot be unwrenched unless disarmed or unbolted through Hacking.

A useful way to bypass the countdown of the bomb (and create an instant explosion) is to strap a signaler onto the boom wire of the bomb. If you can get your hand on some bluespace beakers, the chemical payload can theoretically detonate 2100 units of chemicals/toxins. Capable of very great destruction or other things.


Sitrep

Those of you with no interest in gaming any of Finland’s wars can easily dismiss the need for an expanded Finnish OB. You also may see no need for Russian AFV that the Germans did not encounter during their invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941. You might even get by—as most of us have until now—with using American or British counters to represent Russian Lend-Lease materiel. But then you would be short vehicles that are required for other theatres. The BT-2A, for instance, made its debut in Armies of Oblivion (AoO), which has been out of print for more than five years. This light tank saw combat in Spain, Mongolia, Poland, and Finland, as well as before the gates of Moscow in 1941, and on the Leningrad Front in 1942-43. The Romanians likewise encountered this fast mover, as recounted in the popular scenario “Liberating Bessarabia,” which I have enjoyed playing several times.

Betka BT-2A World Tour

2 comments:

Another interesting and detailed post. As for Hakkaa Päälle. it's a great addition to the Core Modules in my opinion.

I wanted to highlight some of the things that Hakkaa Päälle! brings to the table. A handful of players have been dismissive of its value as a core module. While I appreciate that some players have no interest in playing the Finns (the Finns in BV may have left them jaded), I believe that HP expands the system in other ways.

The module is also more expensive than we are accustomed to, a consequence of higher production costs (and the need to include updated rule pages and charts*). I suspect that this may partly explain why some people feel that HP does not deliver enough bang for their buck. I get that. But what other core module came with 17 (new) scenarios? Before MMP began including reprints of older scenarios, most core modules had only eight or ten scenarios. From a play-what's-in-the-box perspective, HP delivers very good value.

*The ASLRB was specifically designed to incorporate new rules, and changes to older ones. Griping about the cost of replacing pages and chapter dividers due to the addition of new rules specific to the Finns is silly, especially when some of these same people would have no difficulty adding/amending rules to accommodate their favourite theatre/nationality, etc.


Stats

Base stats

  • Body HP - 2100
  • Tread HP - 650
  • Accuracy - 10
  • Body Def - 300
  • Tread Def - 100
  • AP - 550
  • Upgrade grid - 3 x 4

Weapons

Anti-Armor Turret
  • Anti-armor - 72mm Anti-Armor
    • Aim - E
    • Range - 900
    • vsPers - 150
    • vsArmor - 900
    • Shots - 1
    • Aim - C
    • Range - 250
    • vsPers - 170
    • vsArmor - 300
    • Shots - 1
    • Aim - D
    • Range - 200
    • vsPers - 35
    • vsArmor - 54
    • Shots - 7
    Gatling Gun Turret
    • Gatling Gun - Gatling Gun
      • Aim - C
      • Range - 450
      • vsPers - 35
      • vsArmor - 56
      • Shots - 30
      • Aim - D
      • Range - 200
      • vsPers - 35
      • vsArmor - 54
      • Shots - 7
      Flamethrower Turret
      • Flamethrower - Flamethrower
        • Aim - B
        • Range - 200
        • vsPers - 320
        • vsArmor - 57
        • Shots - 1
        • Aim - D
        • Range - 200
        • vsPers - 35
        • vsArmor - 54
        • Shots - 7

        Max stats

        • Body HP - 2400
        • Tread HP - 650
        • Accuracy - 10
        • Body Def - 370
        • Tread Def - 100
        • AP - 550
        • Upgrade grid - 3 x 4

        Weapons

        Anti-Armor Turret
        • Anti-armor - Piercing Rounds
          • Aim - E
          • Range - 900
          • vsPers - 230
          • vsArmor - 1300
          • Shots - 1
          • Aim - C
          • Range - 250
          • vsPers - 360
          • vsArmor - 400
          • Shots - 1
          • Aim - D
          • Range - 200
          • vsPers - 48
          • vsArmor - 60
          • Shots - 7
          Gatling Gun Turret
          • Gatling Gun - Auto-Reload Device
            • Aim - C
            • Range - 450
            • vsPers - 50
            • vsArmor - 60
            • Shots - 30
            • Aim - D
            • Range - 200
            • vsPers - 48
            • vsArmor - 60
            • Shots - 7
            Flamethrower Turret
            • Flamethrower - High-Temp Fuel
              • Aim - B
              • Range - 200
              • vsPers - 580
              • vsArmor - 67
              • Shots - 1
              • Aim - D
              • Range - 200
              • vsPers - 48
              • vsArmor - 60
              • Shots - 7

              Watch the video: OT 133 Flamethrower Tank -Total Tank Simulator