Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital

Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital

Situated in Plattsburgh, New York, Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital (CVPH) is a regional medical center accredited by the Joint Commission and licensed by the New York State Department of Health.The non-profit hospital offers comprehensive patient centered care to the residents of Clinton, Franklin, Essex, and St. It strives to provide quality health care services throughout the region.Operated by Community Providers, Inc., CVPH is licensed as a 341-bed acute care hospital and 54-bed skilled nursing facility. It offers outpatient diagnostic, surgical, and renal dialysis services at the Health Plaza on Plaza Boulevard.For the patients’ convenience, the hospital has two locations for outpatient rehabilitation medicine services - 295 New York Road and 16 Degrandpre Way in Plattsburgh.Inside the campus is the FitzPatrick Cancer Center, providing complete cancer treatment and care. Miner Center.The CVPH Health Center provides primary and comprehensive care for adolescents and adults. Various in-patient nursing units - Emergency Care, Dental Care, Wound/Ostomy/Continence Care, Cardiology, Diagnostic Imaging, Pediatric Care, Nutrition Services, and Perioperative Services - are additional services offered.The Charity Care Program is designed to help people who are unable to pay for services.With excellent staff and cutting-edge technology, the medical center offers the finest health care to the communities they serve.


COLE v. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PHYSICIANS HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER

Elizabeth A. COLE, Individually and as Administrator of the Estate of Edwin E. Cole Sr., Deceased, Respondent, v. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PHYSICIANS' HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER et al., Appellants.

Decided: April 17, 2014

Appeal from an order of the Supreme Court (Muller, J.), entered January 16, 2013 in Clinton County, which denied defendants' motions for summary judgment dismissing the complaint.

Edwin E. Cole Sr. (hereinafter decedent) was admitted to a hospital maintained by defendant Champlain Valley Physicians' Hospital Medical Center (hereinafter CVPH) with complaints of a chronic cough that had begun to produce bloody sputum. A CT scan of decedent's chest revealed fluid collection in the division between the upper and lower lobes of his left lung. An attempt to drain the fluid was unsuccessful and resulted in a collapsed lung. Defendant Craig Nachbauer, a consulting thoracic surgeon, inserted a chest tube to reinflate the lung. The next day, Nachbauer inserted another chest tube and, thereafter, continued to monitor decedent. Defendant William Bruce Bunn, a pulmonologist, scheduled a bronchoscopy 1 for the next day, but canceled the procedure because decedent was suffering from respiratory distress. Bunn and Nachbauer discussed the possibility of performing a thoracoscopy 2 to drain the fluid and scheduled the surgery for two days later. Decedent's condition deteriorated, including advancing pneumonia, renal failure and respiratory distress requiring him to be put on a ventilator. Bunn and Nachbauer determined that decedent was not stable enough to undergo surgery at that time. Approximately two weeks after decedent entered the hospital, Bunn determined that he was stable enough for surgery. The day before the scheduled thoracoscopy, Bunn performed a thoracentesis, 3 removing 1000 ccs of fluid from around decedent's right lung. The next day, Nachbauer performed a bronchoscopy and thoracotomy, removing fluid and a hematoma of old, clotted blood from the left lung area. Nachbauer completed the surgery, apparently without incident, and left the operating room. As defendant Madeline Waid, an anesthesiologist, was replacing a double lumen endotracheal tube with a single lumen tube, a large amount of blood began shooting from the endoctracheal tube. The blood obstructed decedent's airway, ultimately leading to cardiac arrest and death.

Plaintiff, decedent's widow, commenced this medical malpractice and wrongful death action against numerous defendants. The five remaining defendants, 4 through three separate motions, moved for summary judgment dismissing the complaint. Supreme Court denied the motions, prompting defendants to appeal.

Defendants, except CVPH, met their initial burden of establishing entitlement to summary judgment. To meet the initial burden on a summary judgment motion in a medical malpractice action, defendants must present factual proof, generally consisting of affidavits, deposition testimony and medical records, to rebut the claim of malpractice by establishing that they complied with the accepted standard of care or did not cause any injury to the patient (see Suib v. Keller, 6 AD3d 805, 806 [2004] ). Defendants may meet that burden by submitting a defendant physician's affidavit or affirmation describing the facts in specific detail and opining that the care provided did not deviate from the applicable standard of care (see LaFountain v. Champlain Val. Physicians Hosp. Med. Ctr., 97 AD3d 1060, 1061 [2012] Martino v. Miller, 97 AD3d 1009, 1009–1010 [2012] ).

Here, Nachbauer submitted medical records, deposition testimony from numerous physicians, and his own affidavit detailing the care that he provided and opining that his actions fell within the appropriate standard of care. Waid and CVPH submitted medical records, Waid's affidavit and the affidavit of an expert anesthesiologist asserting that Waid's actions met or exceeded the standard of care. Bunn and his practice group, defendant Champlain Valley Pulmonary Associates, P.C. (hereinafter CVPA), submitted medical records and the affidavit of an expert in pulmonary medicine and critical care opining that Bunn complied with the standard of care. These submissions were sufficient to meet the burden on summary judgment for Nachbauer, Waid, Bunn and CVPA. 5 While the submissions were sufficient to show a lack of culpability for Waid-as an employee of CVPH-during the fatal surgery, they did not address decedent's care by CVPH's employees and agents in the two weeks leading up to that surgery, which was also alleged as malpractice contributing to decedent's injuries and death. Accordingly, CVPH was not entitled to summary judgment because it did not meet its initial burden, regardless of the sufficiency of plaintiff's opposing papers (see Alvarez v. Prospect Hosp., 68 N.Y.2d 320, 324 [1986] LaFountain v. Champlain Val. Physicians Hosp. Med. Ctr., 97 AD3d at 1062).

As Nachbauer, Waid, Bunn and CVPA met their initial burden, the burden shifted to plaintiff to demonstrate triable questions of fact regarding whether these defendants deviated from the accepted standards of care and whether decedent suffered injury and death as a result of those deviations (see Martino v. Miller, 97 AD3d at 1010 Maki v. Bassett Healthcare, 85 AD3d 1366, 1369 [2011], appeal dismissed 17 NY3d 855 [2011], lv dismissed and denied, 18 NY3d 870 [2012] ). In opposition to the motions, plaintiff submitted a detailed expert affidavit. 6 The expert opined that Waid, through overinflation or improper insertion of the endotracheal tube, caused the hemorrhage that immediately led to decedent's death. Although the exact source of bleeding was never identified, the expert explained possible ways that Waid may have caused the hemorrhage and stated that such bleeding does not ordinarily occur in the absence of negligence, Waid had exclusive control over decedent's body and the medical instrumentalities at the time, and decedent was unconscious so he could not have contributed to the situation. Therefore, questions of fact exist and plaintiff may rely on the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur to attempt to establish Waid's negligence (see Kambet v. St. Francis Hosp., 89 N.Y.2d 489, 494 [1997] DeCarlo v. Eden Park Health Servs., Inc., 66 AD3d 1211, 1212 [2009] ).

While conceding that Bunn and Nachbauer did not cause the bleeding during surgery that immediately led to decedent's death, the expert opined that these defendants' inadequate care in the preceding two weeks left decedent in a weakened condition such that he could not survive the surgery, but that he could have survived if given proper care in a timely manner. Specifically, the expert states that Bunn should have ordered or performed a bronchoscopy soon after decedent's admission to the hospital, performed the thoracentesis earlier, and scheduled and performed the thoracotomy sooner. Although the primary cause of death was cardiorespiratory arrest due to an acute bleed, other contributing causes of death listed on the autopsy report include acute and chronic lung congestion, “[b]ilateral pleural effusions” and “[s]tatus post drainage blood from the left side of the pleural space.” Bunn's expert pulmonologist stated that Bunn considered surgery early on and scheduled it, but had to cancel it due to decedent's deteriorating condition. Bunn's expert opined that Bunn exercised appropriate medical judgment in accordance with the standard of care by postponing surgery until decedent's respiratory distress and renal failure were under control. Plaintiff's expert indicates that decedent's organ failure and respiratory distress resulted from a failure to timely address the fluid surrounding the lungs, and that addressing the lung condition aggressively and immediately would have avoided these other conditions that caused postponement of the surgery. These factual disputes create questions of fact concerning whether Bunn, and CVPA vicariously, breached the duty to provide adequate medical care and whether any such breach proximately caused decedent any injury.

Plaintiff's expert reaches the same conclusions about Nachbauer's failure to treat decedent's other conditions earlier. Nachbauer contends that, as a surgical consultant rather than a primary care or attending physician, his duty to decedent was limited. Indeed, a physician may limit his or her duty “to those medical functions undertaken by the physician and relied upon by the patient” (Markley v. Albany Med. Ctr. Hosp., 163 A.D.2d 639, 640 [1990] accord Dombroski v. Samaritan Hosp., 47 AD3d 80, 84 [2007] ). Nachbauer averred that his role was limited to inserting chest tubes after decedent's lung collapsed, monitoring those tubes and consulting with decedent's attending physicians regarding the possibility that he would need thoracic surgery. Nachbauer stated that other physicians were treating decedent's infections, pneumonia and renal failure, such that he was not required to address those issues. However, considering the record in a light most favorable to plaintiff, as the nonmoving party (see Longtemps v. Oliva, 110 AD3d 1316, 1318 [2013] ), the medical records and Nachbauer's own deposition testimony indicate that he consulted with Bunn regarding plaintiff's condition and the scheduling of surgeries. To the extent that Nachbauer participated in such consultations and decisions regarding the scheduling of surgeries, he had a duty to decedent to adhere to the appropriate standard of care (see Cygan v. Kaleida Health, 51 AD3d 1373, 1375 [2008] Graddy v. New York Med. Coll., 19 A.D.2d 426, 429 [1963] [stating that where physicians participate jointly in decision-making or diagnosis, each incurs liability for negligence] compare Dombroski v. Samaritan Hosp., 47 AD3d at 86 Markley v. Albany Med. Ctr. Hosp., 163 A.D.2d at 640). Contrasting these defendants' submissions with the opinion of plaintiff's expert that earlier surgical treatment would have provided decedent with a better outcome, the record demonstrates the existence of questions of fact concerning whether Nachbauer deviated from the standard of care and the effect of any such deviation on decedent's health and death. Accordingly, Supreme Court appropriately denied defendants' motions for summary judgment.

Although the record does not contain any information indicating that decedent suffered conscious pain and suffering during his final surgery, he may have suffered such pain and suffering as a result of any alleged medical malpractice committed in the two weeks of hospitalization leading up to that surgery. Thus, that aspect of damages may be sought at trial.

ORDERED that the order is affirmed, with costs.

PETERS, P.J., STEIN and EGAN JR., JJ., concur.

1. A bronchoscopy is an examination with a lighted, flexible tube that is inserted into the patient's trachea for diagnosis of lung problems or to remove inhaled objects.

2. A thoracoscopy involves using a lighted endoscope, inserted through incisions in the chest wall, to examine the lungs and obtain tissue samples for testing.

3. Thoracentesis involves inserting a needle into the pleural cavity-the space between the two thin membranes that line and surround the lungs-to remove fluid or air.

4. Multiple original defendants are no longer involved, as a result of either stipulations of discontinuance or successful motions for summary judgment.

5. The allegations against CVPA are all predicated on vicarious liability related to Bunn's treatment of decedent.


Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital

Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital (CVPH) is a hospital located in Plattsburgh, New York.

Champlain Valley Physicians' Hospital was created in 1972 by the merger of the private Physician's Hospital with Champlain Valley Hospital, a charitable hospital operated by the Grey Nuns. As UVM Health Network - Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital, it is currently a not-for-profit facility incorporating a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and community outreach care services, including an oncology center, a nursing home unit, renal dialysis center, adult and child/adolescent mental health wards, and medical and surgical capabilities. In recent years, the cardiology services provided by Lake Champlain Cardiology Associates have expanded to include coronary interventional care provided by Champlain Valley Cardiology and open-heart surgery, provided by Champlain Valley Cardiothoracic Surgeons. The hospital also has a variety of diagnostic and rehabilitation services.

In 2012, CVPH Medical Center joined Fletcher Allen Partners, now the University of Vermont Health Network. [1]


Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital in Plattsburgh to receive first vaccine shipment this week

Local hospitals are anticipating the arrival of their first shipment of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine any day this week.

The University of Vermont Health Network &ndash Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital confirmed Tuesday it will receive its first shipment of the vaccine later this week and will begin vaccinations as soon as it arrives.

In a press release, the Plattsburgh hospital says they expect a relatively small shipment of 950 doses to begin with due to limited supplies nationwide.

&ldquoWith great excitement and anticipation, we are awaiting our initial delivery of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine &ndash set to arrive this week,&rdquo said CVPH President Michelle LeBeau in the statement.

&ldquoA CVPH committee has developed a plan to provide the first of two doses of the vaccine to our employees according to a New York State Department of Health prioritization matrix,&rdquo she said.

Some doses will also be shared with other North Country hospitals using the same matrix, which takes into consideration a health care worker&rsquos job, department and age.

Besides frontline health care workers, nursing home residents and staff are to be given first priority for the vaccine under the Department of Health&rsquos guidelines.

For security reasons, the Department of Health has asked hospitals to keep confidential which hospitals will receive vaccines from this first allotment.

Other hospitals in the region are also preparing for shipments with the purchase of new freezers to store the vaccine at the subzero temperatures it requires.

A representative of St. Lawrence Health System confirmed they will also be receiving an unspecified number of vaccine doses, as will other hospitals like Adirondack Health in Saranac Lake. Dates for these shipments have not yet been confirmed.

A spokesperson for Samaritan Medical Center in Watertown said Tuesday they expect some of their staff to travel to Plattsburgh to receive the Pfizer vaccine this week.

A separate shipment of 1,200 doses of Moderna&rsquos vaccine &mdash which has also been authorized for emergency use by the FDA &mdash will begin arriving to their facility next week. They plan to vaccinate more staff then.


CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PHYSICIANS HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER Revenue, Growth & Competitor Profile

Trademark applications show the products and services that Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center is developing and marketing. Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center doesn't have any recent trademark applications, indicating Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center is focusing on its existing business rather than expanding into new products and markets. Trademarks may include brand names, product names, logos and slogans.

Trademark Date
CVPH CONTINUOUS LEARNING CENTER "A GREAT PLACE TO REALIZE YOUR POTENTIAL"
Providing formal and informal continuing education services, mainly courses in the fields of medicine, employee orientation and workplace issues
08/15/2005

See all trademarks and details in the Full Report.

Recession Risk

Determine whether Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center grew or shrank during the last recession. This is useful in estimating the financial strength and credit risk of the company. Compare how recession-proof Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center is relative to the industry overall. While a new recession may strike a particular industry, measuring the industry and company's robustness during the last recession estimates its ability to weather future recessions.

U.S. Industry Overview & Market Statistics: Hospitals

  • Market Size
  • Growth Rate
  • 5-Year Market Forecast
  • Average Company Size & Growth
  • Salary & Compensation Benchmarks

Market Share of Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center's Largest Competitors

A competitive analysis shows these companies are in the same general field as Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center, even though they may not compete head-to-head. These are the largest companies by revenue. However, they may not have the largest market share in this industry if they have diversified into other business lines. The "Competition" section of a business plan or investment memorandum would start by analyzing the information about these companies. Competitive advantage comes from offering better pricing or superior products/service.

Company HeadquartersRevenue ($ MM)
UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT MEDICAL CENTERBurlington, VT 100
GREENWICH HOSPITALGreenwich, CT 27
TRINITY HEALTHChelsea, MI 24
1199SEIU NATIONAL BENEFIT FUND & AFFILIATEDNew York, NY 13
TENET HEALTHCAREDallas, TX 13
NJHA INSURANCE FUNDPrinceton, NJ 12
SUTTER HEALTHSacramento, CA 11
HACKENSACK MERIDIAN HEALTHEdison, NJ 10
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH PHYSICIANSPittsburgh, PA 8

Nearby Competitors

These companies are similar in business line and location to Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center. While some companies compete with neighboring businesses for customers, other companies may compete to attract skilled employees.

Company HeadquartersRevenue ($ MM)
CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PHYSICIANS HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTERPlattsburgh, NY 100
ADIRONDACK MEDICAL CENTERSaranac Lake, NY 41
ALICE HYDE MEDICAL CENTERMalone, NY 21
ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY HOSPITALElizabethtown, NY 15

Future Competition: Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center's Fastest Growing Competitors

These companies are in the same general field as Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center and are rapidly expanding. Companies may grow organically or through acquisition. In some cases apparently high growth rates may be caused by data that weren't available in previous years.


Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital serves as North County vaccine hub

Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital has given 200 healthcare workers their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine so far. This first round could take six to eight weeks. Hospital leaders talked to reporters today, after it was announced the hospital will serve as the North Country’s hub.

Vice President for Population Health and Information Services, Wouter Rietsema said this means they will make sure every county and region has what it needs to vaccinate people. There have been more than 200 cases since Thanksgiving.

“Even though these came to market quickly, they were able to do that for a variety of reasons, but one of the reasons they came to quickly was not that any safety steps were skipped once so ever, all the normal safety procedures and development were followed,” Rietsema said.

The state’s next tier of vaccinations will be health care workers outside the hospital setting and the highest risk individuals in the community.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Certified Success: Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital

On our never-ending quest to shine the spotlight on high performing leaders and organizations and learn and share best practices, BCEN was fortunate to be invited to visit Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital (CVHP) in Plattsburgh, New York. We were intrigued to learn that the certification rate has increased by 30% in the last 12 months.

In fact, the 2020 goal set by leadership to have 45% of nurses certified by fourth quarter in 2020, has already been surpassed and is currently at 58% with several more nurses scheduled to test. The energy and excitement around certification that has produced these results have surprised and exceeded the CVPH leadership expectations.

As we spoke with CVPH leadership and staff, the secret sauce to success became very clear. The first thing that is very apparent is that the employees are incredibly valued. The staff are a close-knit group and are very invested in the community, their patients and each other. Because of the deep commitment to quality and safe care for their patients, leadership places a high importance on professional development. Ken Thayer, BSN, R.N. AVP, Patient Care Operations knows that the nurses are the ones who spend the most time with patients. He relies on the nursing team to provide quality care, advocate for the patients and keep things moving. Ken recognizes that professional development, including specialty nursing certification is essential to a high performing nursing team. Each year, Ken ensures the professional development dollars are secure as this is often the first thing to be cut from budgets when dollars get tight.

Further support from the physicians is also evident. Dr. Skinner, M.D., CVPH Emergency Department (ED) Medical Director said the doctors rely heavily on the nurses, especially when the ED is very busy. He said “Certified nurses make the department safer and our quality of life better because they recognize and prioritize what needs attention now. They have an increased knowledge base and the doctors don’t have to worry about the care the patents are receiving.”

CVPH provides a variety of support for professional development and certification. Numerous review courses and other educational offerings are provided to the nurses free of charge. Exam fees are paid upfront or reimbursed depending on the nurse’s preference. There are monies set aside for nurses to attend conferences. When nurses return from a conference, they present something they learned to their peers. There is a strong value placed on learning and being prepared for anything. When someone on the team obtains certification, there are many actions taken from press releases to congratulatory notes, to recognize the accomplishment.

On top of all of this amazing work, the one thing that really “ices the cake” is the deep passion of CVPH’s certification champion, Gina Carbino, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, CFRN, CTRN, TCRN, CCRN, SANE-A, Emergency Department Clinical Education Manager. Gina has a very outgoing personality and is incredibly supportive and encouraging to her team members. She is a strong advocate and believer in certification and, in fact, holds all five BCEN certifications. Gina takes a personal interest in each person and is committed to helping each person on her team achieve certification. 100% is her goal. She sees the future for the Emergency Department at CVPH and it is bright. In the not too distant future, high quality, safe patient care is delivered by a staff of 100% certified nurses. There is a waiting list of nurses who want to work in the CVPH ED.

The lesson here is that while support from leadership and our physician counter parts are essential, never underestimate the effect a passionate certification champion on a mission can make.


Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital (CVPH) is a hospital located in Plattsburgh, New York.

Champlain Valley Physicians' Hospital was created in 1972 by the merger of the private Physician's Hospital with Champlain Valley Hospital, a charitable hospital operated by the Grey Nuns. As UVM Health Network - Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital, it is currently a not-for-profit facility incorporating a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and community outreach care services, including an oncology center, a nursing home unit, renal dialysis center, adult and child/adolescent mental health wards, and medical and surgical capabilities. In recent years, the cardiology services provided by Lake Champlain Cardiology Associates have expanded to include coronary interventional care provided by Champlain Valley Cardiology and open-heart surgery, provided by Champlain Valley Cardiothoracic Surgeons. The hospital also has a variety of diagnostic and rehabilitation services.

In 2012, CVPH Medical Center joined Fletcher Allen Partners, now the University of Vermont Health Network. Ώ]


CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PHYSICIANS HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER 75 BEEKMAN STREET, PLATTSBURGH, NY 12901 www.cvph.org

Organizations Filed Purposes: CVPH MEDICAL CENTER'S MISSION IS TO PROVIDE QUALITY HEALTH CARE FOR THE NORTH COUNTRY REGION IN UPSTATE NEW YORK.

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PHYSICIANS HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER (CVPH)IS A 300 BED ACUTE CARE HOSPITAL AND 54 BED SKILLED NURSING FACILITY. CVPH PROVIDES COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL AND SURGICAL SERVICES TO THE NORTHERN NEW YORK STATE REGION, REGARDLESS OF RACE, CREED, SEX, NATIONAL ORIGIN, HANDICAP, AGE OR ABILITY TO PAY. DURING 2019, CVPH PROVIDED 66,350 PATIENT DAYS OF CARE TO ITS 9,631 ADMISSIONS, AND 44,807 EMERGENCY CARE CENTER VISITS. DURING THE YEAR, 18,134 SURGICAL PROCEDURES WERE PERFORMED. 753 BIRTHS OCCURRED IN CVPH FACILITIES. CVPH EMPLOYS MORE THAN 2,700 INDIVIDUALS. IN ADDITION, THE HOSPITAL HAS 179 MEMBERS OF ITS MEDICAL STAFF, 94% OF WHICH ARE BOARD CERTIFIED. THE HOSPITAL IS JOINT COMMISSION ACCREDITED AND LICENSED BY THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. IN ADDITION TO ITS MAIN CAMPUS, CVPH OPERATES SEVERAL OUTPATIENT FACILITIES WHERE SERVICES ARE PROVIDED TO ITS PATIENTS INCLUDING: AMBULATORY SURGERY, PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, REHABILITATION, RENAL DIALYSIS, AND DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING. CVPH ALSO OPERATES HEALTH CLINICS LOCATED IN OUTLYING GEOGRAPHIC AREAS, TO BETTER SERVE THE HEALTH NEEDS OF CVPH'S RURAL COMMUNITY SERVICE AREA. THROUGH ITS VARIOUS LOCATIONS, OUTREACH ACTIVITIES, AND SUPPORT GROUPS, CVPH IS ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY IN PROMOTING HEALTH AND WELLNESS OF THE BODY, MIND, AND SPIRIT. CVPH PROVIDES ONGOING MEDICAL EDUCATION TO ITS MEDICAL STAFF, IN ADDITION TO OFFERING AN X-RAY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM FOR ENROLLED STUDENTS. CVPH MAINTAINS A COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL LIBRARY AND HAVE MADE AVAILABLE WEB-BASED LINKS FOR THE COMMUNITY TO EASILY ACCESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS. CVPH ACCEPTS NUMEROUS INSURANCE PLANS, AND IS MEDICARE AND MEDICAID APPROVED. ADDITIONALLY, CVPH HAS A CHARITY CARE POLICY TO ACCOMMODATE PATIENTS WHOSE FINANCIAL MEANS ARE WITHIN SPECIFIED GUIDELINES.


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Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital

The Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital (CVPH) is one of six hospitals in the University of Vermont Health Network dedicated to serving individuals and their families in northern New York and Vermont. Located in Plattsburgh, N.Y., opposite Vermont from across Lake Champlain, CVPH runs two distinct, short-term behavioral health units one for adults and one for children and adolescents between the ages of six and 18.

TREATMENT & ASSESSMENT

Behavioral health treatment at CVPH is meant for individuals experiencing a severe crisis. As stays average no more than five to seven days, treatment is very much short-term. Psychiatric issues such as major depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and bipolar disorder are addressed here. Families also play a key role from admissions through discharge.

In both units, programming has three components to it: assessment, stabilization, and discharge planning. Using evidence-based approaches like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), groups help participants develop skills essential for coping, problem solving, and situational perception. Ultimately, clients learn to deal with their emotions more effectively.

STAFF CREDENTIALS

The behavioral health unit features a team of psychiatrists, nurse practitioners and registered nurses, social workers, mental health therapists, and other qualified professionals. CVPH itself has more than 160 physicians and 700 registered nurses on staff.

ACCOMMODATIONS & AMENITIES

The behavioral health hospital has two distinct, short-term units. While there are 18 beds in the adult unit, 12 of which are in private rooms (the remaining six in shared rooms), there are 12 private beds for children and teens.

There are some rules for visitors. Only two visitors are allowed at a time per client, food may be brought from outside, but children 12 and younger are prohibited from visiting. Visiting hours are from 5 to 6 p.m., weekdays, and from 3 to 6 p.m., on weekends.

WHAT FRIENDS & FAMILY SAY

In the sole Best-rehabs.com survey response to date, a loved one, presumably the parent of a former client, outlined their family member’s experience at CVPH: “Even though he didn’t want to be there, he stayed and completed the program. It helped and he was okay for three years. Then unfortunately [he] went back and refuses to stop.”

Despite this impartial success story, the anonymous reviewer gave five stars for the effectiveness of treatment and discharge procedures at the hospital, and four stars for the staff’s level of training and experience, the family inclusion, and the treatment for co-occurring disorders, amongst other areas. They did, however, suggest that there was a “lack of extra activities.”

WHAT STAFF SAY

Best-rehabs.com has not yet received any reviews from this facility’s staff members.

On Indeed, however, 13 individuals awarded the hospital an average rating of 3.9 out of five stars. Collectively, reviewers found that the “very clean” hospital had an “efficient” and “friendly” work environment, where nurses and other staff “really did care about each patient.” [1]

CVPH participates with an extensive list of major insurance plans, including state Medicaid and Medicare, and offers payment plans as well as financial assistance for the uninsured and underinsured.


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