A Civil War camp in Georgia displays a variety of objects

A Civil War camp in Georgia displays a variety of objects

During three years of work, archaeologists have found more than 600 objects at the site of a Georgia Civil War prison and that it has remained practically unchanged since its abandonment in 1864.

The plans for this summer, both from students and professors belonging to Georgia Southern University, will be to delve into Camp Lawton, a prison that housed more than 10,000 prisoners, although cleaning and conservation work will be carried out first on the objects already discovered.

Because only the surface has been explored, it is thought that many more objects will be in view after the summer.

Prison It was built near Millen 50 miles south of Augusta with the goal of replacing the Andersonville jail. The new prison extended more than 42 hectares, but only lasted six weeks, later falling into oblivion because they fled before the advance of the army of General William T. Sherman.

In 2010 a student at the University was surprised when found remains belonging to Camp Lawton and immediately objects were surfacing that will help to tell what happened between the soldiers and the prisoners of that place. Many of the objects found are buttons, hammers, spoons, forks and even tobacco pipes, which are covered in rust that must be cleaned as soon as possible to avoid corrosion.

Meanwhile a local vet's office has donated the use of their x-ray machine to look through the mold covering objects.

When the objects receive their due cleaning and conservation, will be displayed in the public museum that the State Department of Natural Resources is preparing in Magnolia Springs State Park and that will probably open later this summer.

I was born in Madrid on August 27, 1988 and since then I started a work of which there is no example. Fascinated by both numbers and letters and a lover of the unknown, that is why I am a future graduate in Economics and Journalism, interested in understanding life and the forces that have shaped it. Everything is easier, more useful and more exciting if, with a look at our past, we can improve our future and for that… History.


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