The ancient theater of Messinia opens its doors after 1700 years

The ancient theater of Messinia opens its doors after 1700 years

The old Messinia theater It was a place where historical figures of the stature of the King of Macedonia were found, Philip V, and the expert general of the Achaean League, Philopemen of Megalopolis. Now, after 1700 years of neglect, the place that has been part of cultural and political events will open its doors to the public.

The inauguration will take place on August 3 with an opera gala in which the soloists Dimitris Platanias and Tselia Kostea will participate in the framework of the Greek Festival, by the State Orchestra of Athens conducted by Giorgos Kouroupos.

The theater was closed in the 300 AD. and a large part of its seats were reused for the construction of houses and temples. When the excavations began, the place was practically non-existent, the only thing they found were walls and a pile of dirt on the orchestra. The restoration has gone on for more than 20 years and although the koilon has not been completed it will still be done after the summer.

Theater can hold up to 2500 spectators and after the complete completion of the restoration works, it is estimated that this amount will increase to 5,000, this being the same as it had in ancient times.

The ancient theater of Messinia It is located to the northwest of the archaeological zone and the only damage that archaeologists worry about is the women's heels. «The theater was made to enjoy it not to remain closed, the risk comes with the passage of time but not of the people«, Has explained the archaeologist Themelis Petros.

I was born in Madrid on August 27, 1988 and since then I started a work of which there is no example. Fascinated by both numbers and letters and a lover of the unknown, that is why I am a future graduate in Economics and Journalism, interested in understanding life and the forces that have shaped it. Everything is easier, more useful and more exciting if, with a look at our past, we can improve our future and for that… History.


Video: Women in Greek Theatre