New Sutton Hoo Movie Rights the Wrongs of Archaeological Snobbery

New Sutton Hoo Movie Rights the Wrongs of Archaeological Snobbery

The new Sutton Hoo movie, called The Dig, that is due to be released on Netflix is going to tell the real story behind one of Britain’s greatest archaeological discoveries. It dramatizes the excavation at Sutton Hoo in England that changed our understanding of the history of Europe in the Dark Ages . It will also address a decades-old injustice and finally gives credit to the amateur archaeologist who was behind the historic discovery.

The movie focuses on the discoveries made at Sutton Hoo in Eastern England, by a self-taught archaeologist, Basil Brown, who was born near Ipswich in 1888. He had been a farmer, milkman and woodcutter, before securing a job with Ipswich Museum. Brown was poor and had no formal education in archaeology, but he had made some important historical finds in previous years. Brown was a simple country fellow and often used string to hold up his work pants.

Sutton Hoo Movie Tells Story of Eccentric Genius

In 1938 a local widow by the name of Edith Pretty asked Ipswich Museum to excavate some 18 mounds on her land. These were well-known to locals and were the source of many legends. The museum sent out Brown, who was the only person available to investigate the site and he was later helped by Mrs. Pretty’s gardener and gamekeeper.

Photo of the Mound 2 at the Sutton Hoo site. ( CC BY-SA 3.0 )

Brown was something of an eccentric and he was certainly no orthodox archaeologist. According to The Daily Mail , “he would sniff and taste the soil to try to find out what lay beneath and was known for sleeping under hedgerows to feel better connected to the land.” During the first season, he found a looted Anglo-Saxon ship burial. However, what he found in one mound the following year amazed the world.

Anglo-Saxon Boat-Burial

Brown and his colleagues began working on a mound overlooking the River Deben in 1939. The DissMercury reports that “within a few weeks they came across ancient iron rivets. Patient work uncovered an impression of an Anglo-Saxon ship that would turn out to be 27 m (85ft) long.” Brown had found a boat-burial, but mysteriously, no human remains have ever been found at Sutton Hoo.

1939 excavation of burial ship, which the Sutton Hoo movie is based on. (Harold John Phillips / )

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The ship dates to the 6 th or early 7 th century AD, when the Anglo-Saxons were establishing kingdoms in England. The long-boat was “bigger than anything found before,” reports The Daily Mail. Inside the ship, they found a treasure trove including an ornate helmet with a metal mask in the form of a human face.

The Anglo-Saxon helmet is one of the most important finds from Sutton Hoo. (Usernameunique / CC BY-SA 4.0 )

Also uncovered according to The Daily Mail , “was a jewelry set with Sri Lankan garnets, silverware from Byzantium and enameled bronze feasting pots.” Amazingly the burial had avoided being looted by robbers despite at least one recorded attempt.

Class Snobbery

The British newspapers hailed the finds and one would expect that Brown would have been hailed as a hero. However, Britain in the 1930s had a rigid class system and the amateur archaeologist would have been considered lower class. As a result Brown was “sidelined by the archaeological establishment,” the The Daily Mail reports.

Charles Phillips, one of Britain’s then leading archaeologists took over the project and Brown was eventually relegated to shoveling earth. This is even though the amateur had previously conducted a very systematic and methodical investigation of the mounds.

Nevertheless, still Brown did not receive any reward or recognition for his role in the unearthing of the Anglo-Saxon treasures and boat-burial. He returned to work at the local museum and his name was written out of all accounts of this remarkable discovery. Instead, the credit for his work went to others.

Brown retired in 1961 and continued to make archaeological discoveries in his local area, including a Norman era chapel.

Righting a Wrong

The Dig sets out not only to tell the story of the eccentric archaeologist, but also to right the wrong done to Brown, who was the victim of class prejudice. Ralph Fiennes, best known for Schindler’s List , will play Brown in the movie.

Right: Ralph Fiennes who will play Basil Brown in the Sutton Hoo movie, The Dig. (Dick Thomas Johnson / CC BY 2.0 ). Left: Carey Mulligan who will play Edith Pretty. (Foreign and Commonwealth Office / CC BY 2.0 )

Initially, Nicole Kidman was going to play Edith Pretty, but that role has now been taken by acclaimed actress Carey Mulligan. The motion picture “will focus on the partnership between the landowner and the archaeologist who first propelled the legendary excavation into existence and will be a tale of love, loss and hope,” according to the DissMercury.

The relationship between Brown and Edith Pretty was an eccentric one. It is possible that the self-taught archaeologist was autistic, and the widow was interested in the mounds as a result of her belief in spiritualism. The Daily Mail quotes Richard Morris, author of a new biography on the man who found Sutton Hoo, saying that “there was idle village gossip about a brief love affair between Brown and Edith, but I found no evidence of that.” It seemed that their relationship was based on a shared passion for the work at Sutton Hoo.

The true story of Brown and the discovery at Sutton Hoo were first publicized in a novel by John Preston in 2007. The movie is based on this book. It is believed that The Dig will be released in the coming months on Netflix. Most of the treasure found by Brown are on display in the British Museum .


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Sutton hoo museum

The Royal Burial Ground at Sutton Hoo Explore the atmospheric seventh-century Royal Burial Ground as you discover the history and mystery of what lay beneath the earth. Family and Learning Activities We have made some of our learning and family activities available online for you to enjoy both at home and at Sutton Hoo A few miles from the Suffolk coast, the Sutton Hoo ship burial was one of the most exciting discoveries in British archaeology, and one that profoundly exploded the myth of the 'Dark Ages'. There are two Sutton Hoo Helmets in Room 41, the original and a replica showing how the original previously looked Sutton Hoo ist eine archäologische Ausgrabungsstätte in der Nähe der Stadt Woodbridge, Suffolk, in der ostenglischen Region East Anglia. Königreich East Anglia während der frühen Angelsachsen-Periode, mit Sutton Hoo im Südosten nahe der Küste Bergung des Schiffgrabs 193 Home » Museums » Sutton Hoo This hauntingly beautiful 255 acre estate, with far reaching views over the river Deben, is home to one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in Northern Europe. Walk around the ancient burial mounds and discover the incredible story of the ship burial of an Anglo-Saxon King and his treasure possessions The Sutton Hoo ship-burial is on permanent display, year-round, in Room 41 at the British Museum. A small display of archival material relating to Sutton Hoo is now on display in Room 2, until September 2019, to commemorate the 80th anniversary of its discovery. The site of Sutton Hoo is run by the National Trust

Sutton Hoo and Europe British Museum

  1. Sutton Hoo is the site of a group of Anglo-Saxon burial mounds from the 6th and 7th centuries. One of the mounds, excavated in 1939, revealed the remains of a 90-foot long wooden ship. The ship was probably the grave of an Anglo-Saxon king, buried with a wealth of artefacts of the greatest archaeological significance, including Byzantine silver bowls and spoons, jewelled weapons, fine Celtic.
  2. The iconic Sutton Hoo helmet was wrapped in cloth and laid near the left side of the dead person's head. It's a piece of truly breathtaking artistry, functional and beautiful, with a vaulted cap and deep cheek-pieces. The helmet is covered in complicated imagery, including fighting and dancing warriors, and fierce creatures
  3. Opening times at Sutton Hoo. Share: Twitter Facebook Email Important notice - We've re-opened the estate walks and cafe. Tranmer House, the High Hall, bookshop and shop are closed on Thursdays and Fridays. Check What's On for the latest information and to book in advance. If you do not book we cannot guarantee admission. Please note. To avoid disappointment please book in advance.
  4. Part of the burial ground at Sutton Hoo Sutton Hoo from the Deben tideway with Mound 2 visible on the horizon above the farm Sutton Hoo, at Sutton near Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England, is the site of two early medieval cemeteries, from the 6th and/or 7th centuries respectively. The area has been excavated by archaeologists since the 1930s

Britisches Museum, A History of the World in 100 Objects, Nr. 47: Helm von Sutton Hoo ..

Sutton Hoo and Europe 300-1100 C.E., The Sir Paul and Lady Ruddock Gallery © The Trustees of the British Museum The most famous Anglo-Saxon treasures in the Museum come from the Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk. Here mysterious grassy mounds covered a number of ancient graves Sutton Hoo and Europe, AD 300 - 1100 Room 41 (The Sir Paul and Lady Ruddock Gallery) Footage of the display of Anglo-Saxon artefacts found at the Sutton Hoo ship burial in Room 41. Each shot available to license separately Sutton Hoo is a museum in Sutton Hoo,. The museum features exhibits related to: archaeology

Sutton Hoo Narrator : Daniel Evans Director : Lucie Donahu Today, the Sutton Hoo finds form the heart of the British Museum's newly reopened Early Medieval Europe gallery (Room 41: The Sir Paul and Lady Ruddock Gallery of Sutton Hoo and Europe, AD 300-1100), which has been completely refurbished to mark the 75th anniversary of the excavation. It is a change long overdue, curator Dr Sue Brunning said previously this was a dimly lit space, its gloomy. Sehenswürdigkeiten in der Nähe von Sutton Hoo: (0.36 km) Newborne Springs Nature Reserve (12.66 km) Tricky Escape Harwich (2.18 km) Bawdsey Radar Museum (7.53 km) Felixstowe Seafront Gardens (11.79 km) Harwich Redoubt Fort Sehen Sie sich alle Sehenswürdigkeiten in der Nähe von Sutton Hoo auf Tripadvisor an. The Sutton Hoo helmet is a decorated and ornate Anglo-Saxon helmet found during a 1939 excavation of the Sutton Hoo ship-burial. It was buried around 625 and is widely believed to have belonged to King Rædwald of East Anglia its elaborate decoration may have given it a secondary function akin to a crown Sutton Hoo: Historisches Gräberfeld und Museum - Auf Tripadvisor finden Sie 1.387 Bewertungen von Reisenden, 496 authentische Reisefotos und Top Angebote für Woodbridge, UK

Sutton Hoo - Wikipedi

  1. Sutton Hoo, près de Woodbridge (Suffolk, Royaume-Uni), est un site archéologique anglo-saxon où ont été mis au jour en 1939 un cimetière et un bateau funéraire datant du début du VII e siècle.. Son âge, sa taille, sa richesse, sa beauté, sa rareté et son importance historique font de Sutton Hoo l'une des plus grandes découvertes archéologiques en Angleterre
  2. Sutton Hoo, nei pressi di Woodbridge (Suffolk, Regno Unito), è il sito di due cimiteri anglosassoni del VI e VII secolo, uno dei quali conteneva una nave funeraria completa di un gran numero di artefatti di elevato significato archeologico e artistico.. Il ritrovamento di Sutton Hoo è di primaria importanza per gli storici del periodo alto-medioevale inglese, in quanto getta luce su un.
  3. Museum information Ticket prices & discounts for Sutton Hoo The following overview lists the admission prices and various discounts for a visit to Sutton Hoo in Woodbridge
  4. Das British Museum stellt seine glitzernden Schätze aus dem Schiffsgrab von Sutton Hoo (um 600 n.Chr.) in neuem Licht vor. Prächtig dekorierte Helme, Waffen und Schmuck aus dem 1939.
  5. Sutton Hoo, estate near Woodbridge, Suffolk, England, that is the site of an early medieval burial ground that includes the grave or cenotaph of an Anglo-Saxon king. The burial, one of the richest Germanic burials found in Europe, contained a ship fully equipped for the afterlife (but with no body) and threw light on the wealth and contacts of early Anglo-Saxon kings its discovery, in 1939.
  6. Attractions near Sutton Hoo: (0.36 km) Newborne Springs Nature Reserve (2.18 km) Bawdsey Radar Museum (12.66 km) Tricky Escape Harwich (7.53 km) Felixstowe Seafront Gardens (11.79 km) Harwich Redoubt View all attractions near Sutton Hoo on Tripadvisor

, some 1,400 years after it was buried, it is the centrepiece for the Sutton Hoo burial exhibit in the British Museum - a remarkable testament to Anglo-Saxon power and artistic skill Sutton Hoo and Staffordshire Hoard finds are to jointly go on display in new exhibition

Sutton Hoo - The Association for Suffolk Museums

  1. Sutton Hoo stock photo and image search. View and buy royalty free and rights managed stock photos at The British Museum Images. This is just a taste of the images we have available on our site. To see a larger selection, enter a keyword search inside the search field above. Images. Images. Menu / Images. Images. Images. Menu Create account. Sign in. Help. Browse collections. The British.
  2. Sutton Hoo is undergoing a huge re-vamp after a £4 million grant to update and improve the site, particularly the interpretative and viewing facilities. Having always wanted to visit after seeing the finds in the British Museum, a trip to Suffolk meant that we were in an ideal position to do so. It was a freezing cold day with gale force winds, but we didn't let that deter us, and we.
  3. R.L.S. Bruce-Mitford The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial (British Museum Press, 3 Vols: 1975, 1978, 1983) and I Longworth and I Kinnes Sutton Hoo Excavations 1966, 1968-70 (British Museum Occasional Paper No. 23, 1980), and a summary volume is A. C. Evans The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial (British Museum Press, 1986) The results of the 1983-2001 research campaign are published as: M.O.H. Carver Sutton Hoo. A.

Sutton Hoo refers to the site of an Anglo-Saxon (7th century) ship burial in Suffolk, which was first excavated in 1939. The site produced some of the rarest and most valuable objects ever discovered from the Anglo-Saxon time period Sutton Hoo is the site of two 6th- and early 7th-century cemeteries. One cemetery contained an undisturbed ship burial, including a wealth of Anglo-Saxon artefacts of outstanding art-historical and archaeological significance, most of which are now in the British Museum in London. The site is in the care of the National Trust

Sutton Hoo is the site of eighteen Anglo-Saxon burial mounds and the location of the discovery of a massive collection of Anglo-Saxon artifacts. The site was uncovered in 1939 after a local landowner, Edith Pretty, asked Basil Brown, an archeologist from the Ipswich Museum, to investigate the burial mounds on her property The museum is a bit naff however as everything is replicas and you get around the museum pretty quickly. Overall I would recommend although if taking young children or elderly people be mindful of how steep some of the terrain is! Date of experience: September 2018. Ask neo32018 about Sutton Hoo. Thank neo32018 . This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of. Sutton Hoo revealed In 1938, Mrs Edith Pretty, owner of the Sutton Hoo estate, invited local archaeologist Basil Brown to excavate a group of low grassy mounds on the edge of a 30m-high bluff above the Deben estuary in Suffolk, England. He dug Mound 2 in his first season, uncovering a robbed-out Anglo-Saxon ship burial. He was then invited to dig Mound 1 the following year. The discovery of.

Sceptre from the ship-burial at Sutton Hoo 600/650. British Museum London, United Kingdom . This curious object is one of the most extraordinary objects to survive from the Anglo-Saxon period. It is a huge, four-sided whetstone, skilfully carved from a hard, fine-grained stone to give a perfectly smooth surface. Whetstones were tools used to sharpen knife and weapon blades, but this one's. The Sutton Hoo Helmet is one of the most important Anglo Saxon finds of all time. It was buried in the grave of a warrior chieftain. Alongside it were a vast array of weaponry and a 27-metre-long.

Eighty years (and more) of Sutton Hoo - The British Museum

  • The Sutton Hoo ship burial. This is the currently selected item. Sutton Hoo ship burial. Practice: Sutton Hoo ship burial (quiz) Fibulae. Practice: Fibulae (quiz) Next lesson. Test your knowledge of Early Medieval art. Sort by: Top Voted. The Sutton Hoo purse lid. Sutton Hoo ship burial. Up Next. Sutton Hoo ship burial . Our mission is to provide a free, world-class education to anyone.
  • The British Museum - Sutton Hoo and Europe / London mehr. National Maritime Museum - Naval Gallery / London mehr. Fabergé Museum / St.Petersburg mehr. Kunsthistorisches Museum - Kunstkammer / Wien mehr. Mary Rose Museum / Portsmouth mehr. MIM Museum / Beirut mehr. Sberbank of Russia / St.Petersburg.
  • Sutton Hoo is the name of an area spread along the bank of the River Deben opposite the harbor of the town of Woodbridge. The burial site is south of Woodbridge. (5 votes) See 1 more repl
  • This book explains how it was discovered together with other priceless treasures including a ship in the great mound at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, by the archaeologist Basil Brown in the late 1930s. He was employed by the owner of the estate, Mrs Edith Pretty, who generously donated the whole find to the British Museum. After painstaking reconstruction, experts were able to compare this very rare.
  • In 1939 a series of mounds at Sutton Hoo in England revealed their astounding contents: the remains of an Anglo-Saxon funerary ship and a huge cache of seventh-century royal treasure
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  • For my latest visit, I had a special visitor from Norfolk who had always wanted to see the Sutton Hoo collection at the museum. If you have never heard of the Sutton Hoo before, neither had I, until my friend talked about it excitedly whenever he talked about visiting London. For those of you not in the know, Sutton Hoo is the site of two 6th and early 7th-century cemeteries near Suffolk, a.

Sutton Hoo National Trust Collection

The new Sutton Hoo movie, called The Dig, that is due to be released on Netflix is going to tell the real story behind one of Britain's greatest archaeological discoveries. It dramatizes the excavation at Sutton Hoo in England that changed our understanding of the history of Europe in the Dark Ages .It will also address a decades-old injustice and finally gives credit to the amateur. On the Sutton Hoo helmet the silvery hue of the original tinned surface of the panel may yet be seen on one part of the background of helmeted warrior (Panel DB). In general original tinned bronze surface has changed to one of tin and copper salts, stained with iron. Their present average colour is a rusty brown The Museum of the World - an interactive experience through time, continents and cultures, featuring some of the most fascinating objects in human history. The project is a partnership between the British Museum and Google Cultural Institute. For the first time ever, discover objects from the British Museum's collection from prehistory to the present using the most advanced WebGL (Web. Sutton Hoo is rightly famed as one of Europe's great archaeological discoveries. The burial of an Anglo-Saxon king in an ocean-going ship, accompanied by fabulous wealth, astounded the public and scholars alike when excavated in 1939

This extraordinary helmet is very rare. Only four complete helmets are known from Anglo-Saxon England: at Sutton Hoo, Benty Grange, Wollaston and York. The.. The Sutton Hoo Ship excavation 1939 (c) Trustees of the British Museum. The team will build the Saxon ship using authentic ship-building methods with the help of marine archaeologists, ship architects, shipwrights and experts in green wood working. Together with strong academic support from the Universities of York and Southampton the team will ensure detailed records are kept at every stage. The spectacular # SuttonHoo treasure was unearthed # onthisday in 1939 - one of the most significant archaeological discoveries ever made in the UK! Uncovered in the east of England, the site was probably the burial of an Anglo-Saxon king and contained meticulously crafted metalwork and jewellery The Sutton Hoo helmet, early 7th century, iron and tinned copper alloy helmet, consisting of many pieces of iron, now built into a reconstruction, 31.8 x 21.5 cm (as restored) (The British Museum) (photo: Steven Zucker, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 The Sutton Hoo helmet is a decorated and ornate Anglo-Saxon helmet found during a 1939 excavation of the Sutton Hoo ship-burial. It was buried around 625 and is widely believed to have belonged to King Rædwald of East Anglia Reis Leder Buch Tasche Keltische Kunst Eisenzeit Tätowierungen Skulpturen Alte Kunst Juwele

The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial is one of the greatest treasures ever found in England. Over 1,300 years old, it sheds light on the myths and legends during the period that followed the collapse of the Roman Empire. The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial was discovered in Suffolk, East Anglia, and is the site of two 6th and 7th Century cemeteries Room 41. The British Museum in Great Russell Street, London. This gallery on the upper floor is devoted to Sutton Hoo and Europe, AD 300 to 1100

The Anglo-Saxon ship burial at Sutton Hoo British Museum

  1. The cheapest way to get from Natural History Museum to Sutton Hoo costs only £19, and the quickest way takes just 1¾ hours. Find the travel option that best suits you
  2. About Sutton Hoo Address: Tranmer House, Sutton Hoo, Woodbridge, East Anglia, Suffolk, England, IP12 3DJ Attraction Type: Prehistoric Site Location: On B1083 between Melton and Bawdsey. Website: Sutton Hoo Email: [email protected] Location map OS: TM288491 Photo Credit: David Ross and Britain Expres
  3. Aug 24, 2017 - Explore Mary (Mimi) Embree's board Sutton Hoo hoard on Pinterest. See more ideas about Sutton hoo, Anglo saxon, Saxon
  4. British Museum Sutton Hoo Treasure Sutton Hoo Helmet. The replica helmet and mask are part of the Sutton Hoo Treasure (Wiki) with more at Sutton Hoo Site. The original find is further down together with more artifacts from antiquity. The Museum. The British Museum (for details, admission and location) is probably the largest in the UK and contains artifacts from all over the world, from.
  5. The finds at Sutton Hoo changed historians' views about the Anglo-Saxon period, which had been regarded as a Dark Age following the end of Roman Britain. From. Burial Mound 1, Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England . Date. AD 600 - 650. Culture. Anglo-Saxon. Material. iron with bronze plates covered in tin, bronze-gilt, garnets. Dimensions. height: 31.8 cm width: 21.5 cm circumference: 74.6 cm.
  6. Sutton Hoo is 11 miles northeast of Ipswich off the B1083. Tickets & tours. Normandy British D-DAY Sites - Sword Beach & Hilmann Bunker Half day Tour. $79.92. and up. Details . More tickets & tours. Details. near Woodbridge. 01394-389700. Visit website. Hours:10.30am-5pm Feb-Sep, to 4pm Sat & Sun Jan. Price:adult/child £8.90/4.50. The massive effort that went into Raedwald's burial gives some.
  7. My group did enjoy there visit to Sutton Hoo. I came here about twenty years ago when the site had a mound of earth and nice views. It now has a visitor centre but almost every artifact has been removed and is in the British Museum. This may be unfair but I can see little point

Opening Times Sutton Hoo National Trus

However, Sutton Hoo will display some items found during a 1991 excavation. A 17-metre viewing tower is currently being constructed and will open in September. Related Topic Sep 23, 2016 - Explore Mark Sanders's board Sutton Hoo Reproductions on Pinterest. See more ideas about Sutton hoo, Anglo saxon, Saxon As this month's contribution to the 'great excavations' mini-series, I turn my attention to a 'great' project of Anglo-Saxon archaeology: Sutton Hoo in Suffolk. The site is one of the best-known in the country thanks to the stunning array of high-status grave goods recovered during the 1939 excavations and displayed in the British Museum since the late 1940s Jul 3, 2013 - Sutton Hoo More information Ceremonial Mask of Sutton Hoo: Sutton Hoo, near Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England is the site of two 6th- and early 7th-century cemeteries Sutton Hoo Sutton Hoo, at Sutton near Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England, is the site of two early medieval cemeteries, from the 6th to 7th centuries.Archaeologists have been excavating the area since the 1930s

Attractions near Sutton Hoo: (0.22 mi) Newborne Springs Nature Reserve (7.91 mi) Tricky Escape Harwich (1.36 mi) Bawdsey Radar Museum (4.71 mi) Felixstowe Seafront Gardens (7.37 mi) Harwich Redoubt View all attractions near Sutton Hoo on Tripadvisor Sutton Hoo Helm, Zimmer 41 British Museum, London, UK. Die angelsächsischen Helm und Maske aus der Sutton Hoo Schatz, 7. Artist: Unbekannt Sutton Hoo Maske Anglo Saxon Sutton Hoo Helm Suffolk, große skulpturale Replik eines Angelsächsischen Helm über dem Eingang zum Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre, Suffolk UK ausgesetzt. Das British Museum, London, England. 9-2013 Sutton Hoo Anglo Saxon. The Sutton Hoo Helmet (British Museum Objects in Focus) Sonja Marzinzik. 4,6 von 5 Sternen 3. Taschenbuch. 6,50 € The Staffordshire Hoard Kevin Leahy. 4,3 von 5 Sternen 37. Taschenbuch. 7,50 € Carver, M: Sutton Hoo Story - Encounters with Early England Martin Carver. 4,6 von 5 Sternen 7. Taschenbuch. 24,00 € Weiter. Kunden haben sich auch diese Produkte angesehen. Seite 1 von 1 Zum.

Helm von Sutton Hoo - Wikipedi

  • Sutton Hoo estas alta krutaĵo sur la maldekstra bordo de rivero Deben, ĉ. 7 mejlojn de la maro. Oni malkovris entombigajn altaĵojn tie, kaj jam prirabis ilin ekde 1601.Oni priserĉis la areon per modernaj arkeologiaj ekzamenaj metodoj en 1938 akj en 1939 kaj oni malkovris la ŝipan entombigon de Sutton Hoo. Pli postaj elfosaĵoj okazis fine de la 1960-aj jaroj kaj inter 1986 kaj 1992
  • Title: Shoulder clasp from the ship burial at Sutton Hoo Location: British Museum, London, UK Physical Dimensions: Shoulder-clasps blue glass, chequerboard.
  • The British Museum Sutton Hoo and Europe AD 300-1100 London The British Museum in London is surely one of the most renowned cultural and historical museums of the world. The main theme of their Gallery 41 is the Anglo-Saxon ship grave of the Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, a spectacular and important discovery of British archaeology. For this newly designed exhibition, which reopened in 2014.

Sutton Hoo, an Anglo-Saxon treasure collected across

  • THE SUTTON HOO SOCIETY, a registered charity, was formed to support the work of the Sutton Hoo Research Project (director Prof. Martin Carver, University of York). An archaeological excavation and research programme was undertaken between 1983 and 1992. Part of the Society's early role was to guide visitors round the excavation. Between 1992 - 2001, the SHS continued to watch over the site.
  • One of Britain's most important archaeological discoveries has been transformed in a £4million revamp. The burial mound of Sutton Hoo in Suffolk is thought to be where King Raedwald is buried
  • Angelsächsischer Helm von Sutton Hoo Die archäologische Ausgrabungsstätte von Sutton Hoo im englischen East Anglia umfasst zahlreiche Grabhügel, darunter das berühmte Schiffsgrab, aus dem im Jahre 1939 bemerkenswert gut erhaltene, kostbare Artefakte aus dem 7. Jahrhundert geborgen wurden. Die bekanntesten Funde aus diesem Grab dürften die goldene Prachtschnalle (Great Gold Buckle) und.
  • Bettany visits Sutton Hoo in Suffolk to piece together a profile of the mystery king who was buried in the world famous Anglo-Saxon ship burial. A strong contender was King Raedwald who was important enough to warrant such a VIP burial. Bettany handles master crafted replicas of the 'Mound 1' treasures (the originals are now in the British Museum) with researcher Laura Howarth and learns.
  • How did it come to the British Museum? The Sutton Hoo Burial was discovered by archaeologist Basil Brown in 1939 when excavating the largest of 18 mounds on a Suffolk estate. When found, the helmet had been crushed by the collapse of the mound and was in 500 pieces. First restored in 1947, it was taken apart and reassembled in 1968 based on later available research. That was when the.
  • At Sutton Hoo the spoons were closely associated with a set of silver bowls bearing a cruciform decoration and were placed close to the right side of the position which should have been occupied by the head of the deceased. R. L. S. Bruce Mitford of the British Museum (Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology, Vol. XXV, 1949),.

Sutton Hoo Ship Burial - Smarthistor

  • Das British Museum stellt seine glitzernden Schätze aus dem Schiffsgrab von Sutton Hoo (um 600 n.Chr.) in neuem Licht vor. Prächtig dekorierte Helme, Waffen und..
  • At Sutton Hoo, that includes telling the remarkable stories not only of Raedwald, the seventh-century king who is most widely believed to have been buried with the treasure, but of the discovery.
  • Sutton Hoo, including landscaping and access roads, a car park, exhibition space, and on-site interpretation. n The primary objective was to make the story and academic research into Sutton Hoo, a site of exceptional archaeological importance, accessible to the public by creating a major new exhibition. This would complement the display of objects at the British Museum and greatly increase the.

The recent redisplay of the Sutton Hoo discoveries at the British Museum shows the objects familiar to frequent visitors in a new setting and with new interpretation. What I liked most about the redisplay was the context given to the finds. The display case is long and tall with the outline of a ship in white. The photo shows this is faint but helps remind visitors that the objects come from a. Britain's most famous archaeological treasure trove, the Sutton Hoo artifacts have delighted visitors to the British Museum for eighty years. For many, the iconic Sutton Hoo helmet has come to symbolize England in the time of King Arthur. The Institute for Digital Archaeology, in collaboration with the Sutton Hoo Ship's Company, will bring the Sutton Hoo burial ship back to life through an.

Sutton Hoo treasure display The British Museum Image

  • gham University Field Archaeology unit), is appointed by Sutton Hoo Research Trust to direct the new Sutton Hoo project. 1 983 March: Sutton Hoo exhibition opens at Woodbridge Museum
  • image caption One of the greatest finds at the Sutton Hoo boat burial is this warrior's helmet, which is kept at the British Museum in London. The remains of the royal burial ship were first.
  • I loved Sutton Hoo when I visited it, especially as the British Museum had lent a load of beautiful artifacts to the visitor centre for an exhibition. I visited with my mother years ago and I don't believe Tranmer House was open for visitors then - at least, we didn't go there. I have since seen the treasures at the British Museum but there isn't the same magic about them, so far away.
  • Many of the finds from Sutton Hoo were donated by the landowner to the British Museum, but some of these will be returning for the exhibition alongside the Staffordshire Hoard. Visitors will be able to see all of the exhibits in the exhibition hall, as well as visit the new display about Sutton Hoo, which includes a mixture of original pieces and reconstructions. A visit to the site also.
  • . Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts.
  • Sutton Hoo Helmet at the British Museum. A 2016 study found that a black carbon-based material found aboard the luxurious, 7th-century ship, buried at a site called Sutton Hoo in England, is bitumen - an organic, petroleum-based asphalt that is found only in the Middle East. The Anglo-Saxon ship buried in honor of a 7th-century monarch carried the rare, tar-like material. The ship's burial.

Sutton Hoo (Woodbridge) - Reviews & Visitor Information

Sutton Hoo is a hauntingly beautiful estate set in a whopping 255 acres with amazing views over the River Deben. It seems quiet but it's also home to one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern history Andere Wachen behaupten, sie hätten die Türen zur Sutton Hoo-Galerie verriegelt. Wenig später hätten sie dann wieder weit offen gestanden. Angeblich sollen Überwachungskameras den Spuk im. Sutton Hoo, Woodbridge: See 1,410 reviews, articles, and 512 photos of Sutton Hoo, ranked No.7 on Tripadvisor among 28 attractions in Woodbridge Perfekte Sutton Hoo Treasure Displayed At The British Museum Stock-Fotos und -Bilder sowie aktuelle Editorial-Aufnahmen von Getty Images. Download hochwertiger Bilder, die man nirgendwo sonst findet Sutton Hoo parade helmet (British Museum, restored). Although based on late Roman helmets of spangenhelm type, the immediate comparisons are with contemporary Vendel Age helmets from eastern Sweden. Sutton Hoo, (grid reference TM288487) near Woodbridge, Suffolk, is the site of two Anglo-Saxon cemeteries of the 6th and early 7th centuries, one of which contained an undisturbed ship burial.

Sutton Hoo - Masterpieces of the British Museum - BBC

The most famous Anglo-Saxon treasures in the Museum come from the Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk. Here mysterious grassy mounds covered a number of ancient graves. In one particular grave, belonging to an important Anglo-Saxon warrior, some astonishing objects were buried, but there is little in the grave to make it clear who was buried there. Sutton Hoo. The Sutton Hoo ship excavation in. The British Museum is famous for its huge collection of artifacts. The invaluable Anglo-Saxon treasures that you could find in this museum came from the burial site of Sutton Hoo in Suffolk. Many ancient graves lie hidden in the grassy lands of Sutton Hoo, and one of the graves here belonged to an Anglo-Saxon warrior. A lot of impressive. Sutton Hoo View full image Letter from an official at the Department of British Medieval Antiquities at the British Museum to the Inspector of Ancient Monuments, 8th June 1939 (WORK 14/2146 Sutton Hoo Helmet is one of The Legendary Artifacts, that can be stored and displayed at Museum. It can be received from a Legendary Artifact Chest. Sutton Hoo is a 7th-century burial site located in modern-day England. During the site's excavation, archeologists discovered an 89ft burial-ship containing untouched kingship relics, including the Sutton Hoo helmet. The helmet's face mask is a. Sutton Hoo by Woodbridge yn Suffolk, Ingelân, is it plak dêr't twa Angel-Saksyske begraafplakken út de 6e iuw en iere 7e iuw bleatlein binne yn 1939.Op ien dêrfan waard in noch net fersteurd skipsgrêf fûn mei in soad artefakten dy't fan grut keunsthystoarysk en archeologysk belang west hawwe.. De grêven binne dy fan de Angelsaksyske elite út dy tiid

Sutton Hoo at the British Museum - Current Archaeolog

Museum information The following overview lists the visiting hours for Sutton Hoo in Woodbridge . Please note that opening hours on special days or holidays may differ from what is displayed here Sutton Hoo Ship Burial, c. 700 (British Museum, London) Multiple bronze, gold and silver objects of Anglo Saxon origin, found in Suffolk, England, including: a helmet, sceptre, sword, hanging bowl, bowls and spoons, shoulder clasps, a belt buckle, and purse lid. Learn More on Smarthistor


Ammonite: The real life Mary Anning’s incredible dinosaur discoveries from the age of 12

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Ammonite: Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan star in trailer

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they'll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Back in January, film fans were fascinated by Netflix movie The Dig&rsquos portrayal of the real-life Sutton Hoo excavation and all the treasure discovered at the 7th century Anglo-Saxon ship&rsquos burial site. Ralph Fiennes&rsquo Basil Brown, who was once described as an amateur archaeologist due to being self-taught, was hired to work on what would be one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all time. And now new film Ammonite is inspired by the life of British palaeontologist Mary Anning, who similarly made incredible historical finds despite her lack of formal education in her own subject.

Related articles

Born in Lyme Regis on May 21, 1799, Mary&rsquos early life was marked by tragedy, after eight of her nine siblings died.

Growing up and living in relative poverty throughout her short life, Anning became world-famous for her Jurassic marine fossil bed discoveries in the cliffs along the English Channel at her birthplace in Dorset.

Her amazing geographical findings are some of the most important in history and their evidence contributed to big changes in scientific thought at the time regarding prehistoric life and the age of the Earth.

Incredibly, in 1811, the fossil collector and dealer was just 12-years-old when she discovered a 5.2m (17ft) skeleton, now known to be an ichthyosaur.

Ammonite: The real life Mary Anning&rsquos incredible dinosaur discoveries from the age of 12 (Image: LIONSGATE)

Kate Winslet at Mary Anning in Ammonite (Image: LIONSGATE)

READ MORE

Later on, Anning would find the first complete skeleton of a plesiosaur, a marine reptile.

Additionally, she went on to discover the UK's first known remains of a pterosaur, believed to be the largest-ever flying animal.

For those interested, the palaeontologist&rsquos discoveries including the ichthyosaur, plesiosaur and pterosaur are on display in the National History Museum to this day.

Despite Anning making such ground-breaking finds, she was sadly not accepted by the scientific community in her lifetime.

Ammonite is available for premium rental at home on all digital platforms from March 26 (Image: LIONSGATE)

The Dig: Carey Mulligan stars in Netflix trailer

This was mainly due to early 19th-century attitudes towards her poor background, non-conformist Protestantism and, of course, her gender.

Even when Anning sold some of the fossils she found, they were often credited in museums under the names of men who had bought them off here.

She died of breast cancer on March 9, 1847, at the age of 47-years-old. Her much-deserved recognition and legacy have grown over the following two centuries.

Anning is buried at St Michael the Archangel Church in the town of her birth and work, Lyme Regis.

Related articles

Since Anning never married, and it's unknown if she had lovers, Francis Lee&rsquos new movie Ammonite follows a speculative romantic relationship between Winslet&rsquos palaeontologist and Ronan&rsquos Charlotte Murchison.

The latter was a real-life and contemporary British geologist alongside her husband Sir Roderick Murchison.

Ammonite&rsquos synopsis reads: &ldquoIn the 1840s, acclaimed self-taught palaeontologist Mary Anning works alone on the wild and brutal Southern English coastline of Lyme Regis.

&ldquoThe days of her famed discoveries behind her, she now hunts for common fossils to sell to rich tourists to support herself and her ailing widowed mother.&rdquo

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The synopsis continues: &ldquoWhen one such tourist, Roderick Murchison, arrives in Lyme on the first leg of a European tour, he entrusts Mary with the care of his young wife Charlotte, who is recuperating from a personal tragedy.

&ldquoMary, whose life is a daily struggle on the poverty line, cannot afford to turn him down but, proud and relentlessly passionate about her work, she clashes with her unwanted guest. They are two women from utterly different worlds.

&ldquoYet despite the chasm between their social spheres and personalities, Mary and Charlotte discover they can each offer what the other has been searching for: the realisation that they are not alone. It is the beginning of a passionate and all-consuming love affair that will defy all social bounds and alter the course of both lives irrevocably.&rdquo

Ammonite is available for premium rental at home on all digital platforms from March 26.


Thursday, October 25, 2018

The death of pots

Through huge swaths of the archaeological record we have pottery. It enters the record in the Neolithic, and marks the point where humans are able to make a stew (woven baskets carry water with difficulty and burn when held over a fire). They mark the transition to an agricultural economy, with storage of perishables and the making of beer.

The first thing Jaques Coustou noticed when he dove on the wrecks near “The Island of Rabbits” just beyond the harbor of Iraklion was amphorae. They are visible now in a nearby museum the jugs carrying Cretan wines and other trade goods. And you can tell, instantly, that you are looking at two different eras. The same transport jugs for most probably the same trade goods are distinctly 2nd century AD (enough that I was able to guess without seeing the museum placard first), and as distinctly a different era for a second ship (this one Byzantine).

The pottery forms the most distinct sequencing for most archaeology. Like tree rings it doesnt have an inherent date it has to be lined up by other methods, from carbon dates of the residue of a wine to the inclusion of a scarab bearing the name of a recorded Pharaoh in the assembage. This makes things interesting for the amatuer, as most of the literature will place an event or occupation or find within the context of the pottery culture “Proto-Geometric” or “Late Helladic phase II.” And of course there is constant adjustment and argument about where to stick these arbitrary demarkations, and how appropriate they are when applied to trading, polyglot, evolving cultures where pottery of numerous sequences may co-exist and be found in a single assemblage.

One is often tempted to draw too much from the pots. But like Herodotus, it is because that may be most of what we have. One can look back through the history of the field and recognize the way previous eras had viewed the artistic changes through their own lenses. It is too easy even today to reach for “brutal,” or “a crude copy of. ” when trying to describe a style. But what alternative do we have to applying our own aesthetic reaction? There are not (despite some valient attempts in the past) easy ways to create metrics for art.

As I strolled though the National I was presented with a series of galleries moving from Post-Mycenaean out to the full glory of the Attic. And if you look through other galleries you can go from Neolithic Cycladian pottery (which has odd similarties to the much, much later proto-gemometric), through Minoan and the rightly-celebrated Kameres Ware (which made its way to Egypt and Syria and the Greek Mainland), and then the Mycenaean transition. And, yes, my reaction is not untypical for the cultural preconceptions I live within that the first products of the Mycenae workshops were crude reproductions of the High Minoan. There was a Mycenae octopus that reminded me strikingly of anime art done by amatuer fans tracing the lines without understanding their purpose.

But this is reading intent that may not have been there. Aesthetic intents aside, these were mostly commercial productions and as a long-time theatre person I understand too well how market forces and practical constraints influence the final result. The one thing that is very distinct is when the Mycenae move in the art turns more bloody. The Minoans were fabulous at capturing the line of a bird in flight or a waving frond of sea lilly but the Mycenae were focused on the clash of wills and strength of limbs a focus on the athletic, martial body that has a visible culmination in the red-figure ware.

So, yes, you look at the proto-geometric and it hard not to think of art that has lost the equivalent of the guilds and academies and is reduced, first to crude attempts to continue, then gives up and goes for equally crude and terribly simplistic geometric scribbles. And then the geometric figures get more complicated and refinments like rulers come in, and what was an idea turns into an oppressive meme, the style taking over, until the entire pot is covered with obsessive tiny details. But in the background, the desire to do figure work is still there. At first all they can handle are silhouettes, and then they start scratching into the black silhouettes to describe muscles and cloth folds and other details in a sort of reverse cartooning.

But this is not fair. It is an impression I, a product of the classical Western art tradition, share with the Renaissance and later artists who celebrated most when their Greek idols came closest to realism. It might not have been until the turn of the century that a new apreciation (as part of that era’s Orientalizing phase), of the free-flowing styalization of the Minoan returned.

And here’s a little personal observation. I learned when trying to draw cartoons that the ruler is not the “better” or “more evolved” approach. A free-hand line has more life and looks better and often describes the world better. And is harder and takes more experience (experience with a ruler, even).

Well, these are very old discussions. Suffice to say that there are distinct changes and there are many fascinating socioogical ideas when can propose from them. And those exist because ceramics are constant and durable. Linear A and B exist for us now because the fires that swept through their respective civilizations baked the soft, malleable, ever-so-handy clay used to make tally marks into nearly indestructable ceramics.

And here’s the thing. At home, I drink from plastic. I cook with metal. My goods come in cans or, again, more plastic. Sure, there are some parallels plastic comes from a natural substance that is collected and processed. Except petroleum distilllates are a long distance from the clay of a river bank. Anyone can make clay. It takes a hell of a lot more than a village to make plastics it takes a large-scale industrial civilization.

Plastics last. Regretttably so. There is not a spot on the ocean today where you cant find some. But in what ways will plastics serve future generations of archaeologists?


A layer of early snow has graced the monumental Great Wall of China and although it looks stunning, people are struggling to walk along its now slippery surface.

China Daily Life - Weather

The star also revealed how his co-star Pedro Pascal had attempted to make light of the situation.

Damon revealed that Pascal said: &ldquo&lsquoYeah, we are guilty of whitewashing.

&ldquo&lsquoWe all know only the Chinese defended The Wall against the monster, [but]&hellipit was nice to react a little sarcastically &lsquocause we were wounded by it.

&ldquo&lsquoYou know, we do take that seriously. That&rsquos a serious thing.&rsquo&rdquo

Damon pointed out the film is a co-production between the US and China

Pascal himself added: &ldquoWe don&rsquot want people to be kept from work that they wouldn&rsquot have the opportunity otherwise to see it, [which] is very specifically Chinese.

&ldquoIt is a creature feature. It&rsquos a big, fantastical, popcorn entertainment movie, but it has a visual style that is very in its own way [Chinese].&rdquo

Damon also pointed out the film is a co-production between the US and China, with Chinese director Zhang Yimou.

The film&rsquos latest trailer gave more of a backstory to Damon&rsquos character, as a visitor from a far off land, rather than a Chinese part as some suspected.

The Great Wall is released in UK cinemas February 24, 2017.

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Victoria and Abdul: The young servant who scandalised the Queen’s court

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Judi Dench and Ali Fazal in Victoria and Abdul

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they'll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Their habit of sharing daily private moments scandalised princes, prime ministers and potentates alike.

&ldquoI am so very fond of him,&rdquo Victoria wrote privately. &ldquoHe is so good and gentle and understanding all I want and is a real comfort to me.&rdquo

But more than a century later, the movie Victoria And Abdul, coming to screens in September, with Dame Judi Dench playing the Queen, finally blows the lid off her controversial and long-hidden affection for the man who became her most trusted companion.

Related articles

&ldquoQueen Victoria was very lonely, depressed and tired as she celebrated 50 years on the throne, and Abdul Karim re-invigorated her,&rdquo reveals Shrabani Basu, whose book Victoria And Abdul inspired the movie, which features Ali Fazal as the Queen&rsquos servant.

&ldquoThey grew very close. Abdul became her friend, teacher, confidante and adviser. There was an affection between them and the Royal Household hated it.&rdquo

The pair were worlds apart. The monarch of the British Empire and the Indian prison pharmacy assistant&rsquos son. Yet their extraordinary friendship is revealed in palace archives and Abdul&rsquos recently discovered journal, adding to the new edition of Basu&rsquos book, published last week.

&ldquoVictoria had been lonely since the deaths of her husband Prince Albert in 1861 and of her Scottish gillie John Brown in 1883. There was a void in the Queen&rsquos life when she met Abdul, who was sent as a gift from India to celebrate the Queen&rsquos Golden Jubilee in 1887.&rdquo

A handsome 24-year-old with a black beard, 6ft tall in scarlet tunic and white turban, Abdul was intended to be Victoria&rsquos orderly, catering to the needs of visiting Indian princes.

Queen Victoria and Abdul Karim in the Garden Cottage, Balmoral, 1890

Serving her breakfast at Windsor, Abdul knelt and kissed the Queen&rsquos feet and locked eyes with 68-year-old Victoria, who was smitten.

&ldquoHe was young and full of energy and charm, captivating Victoria with exotic tales of India, its festivals and rivalries between Hindus and Muslims,&rdquo says Basu. &ldquoHe told her stories of India&rsquos maharajas and Mughal emperors, of Indian history and his own observations.

&ldquoWithin months he was cooking her curries and, soon after, became her &lsquomunshi&rsquo, or teacher. She wanted to speak with maharajas in their native tongue and asked Abdul to teach her.&rdquo

Andul was &ldquoa very strict master and a perfect gentleman,&rdquo Victoria wrote. For 13 years she studied daily, learning to read, write and speak Urdu.

&ldquoVictoria felt Abdul understood her better than anyone and she trusted him completely,&rdquo says Basu. &ldquoThey discussed the most intimate details of their lives.&rdquo

She advised Abdul on pregnancy, childbirth and even his wife&rsquos gynaecological issues. Over time, the adoring Queen increased Abdul&rsquos responsibilities, making him her personal secretary, putting him in charge of her growing entourage of Indian servants, even taking him pheasant hunting.

Abdul&rsquos Isle of Wight house

Victoria was besotted &ndash some would say obsessed &ndash with Abdul, showering him with gifts.

&ldquoThe Queen gave him land in India, grand titles and honours, a cottage at each of her palaces and his own carriage on the royal train next to hers,&rdquo says Basu.

She gave him the grand title Munshi Hafiz Abdul Karim and there was no longer any question of him waiting tables. She seated him at events with the Royal Family and equerries &ndash not the servants.

When apart, Victoria wrote to Abdul every day, signing her letters &ldquoyour dearest friend&rdquo, &ldquoyour true friend&rdquo even &ldquoyour dearest mother&rdquo. In their later years together, Victoria signed in Urdu.

At Balmoral she gave him the room that had once belonged to John Brown, the much-loved gillie who was also the subject of wild rumours during his lifetime. And one winter she and Abdul spent the night alone in Balmoral&rsquos secluded Widow&rsquos House on the banks of Loch Muick where she had once hidden away with Brown.

Abdul also advised her on Indian politics and the woes of the Muslim minority, which drew Victoria increasingly into Indian politics, much to the chagrin of the prime minister and the Indian viceroy.

Abdul was the last person to see Victoria's body alone when she died in 1901

His rise in the palace was swift. Abdul was awarded the Eastern Star and made a Commander of the Victorian Order. Victoria had Abdul painted by royal portraitists, allowed him to carry a sword and wear his medals at Court. She also brought his wife and family to England.

She kept his photo beside her dressing table and common gossip held that they were lovers. But Victoria&rsquos affection toward &ldquoa mere servant&rdquo engendered loathing among her family and advisers.

&ldquoThe Royal Household abhorred Abdul, deeply suspicious of his influence over the Queen,&rdquo says Basu. &ldquoEveryone hated him, except for Victoria. She defended her &lsquodear munshi&rsquo relentlessly.&rdquo

Prime minister Lord Rosebery, the Prince of Wales, Princess Louise, Princess Beatrice and Prince Henry were among many expressing their dislike of Abdul to the Queen.

&ldquoThe Royal Household saw him as a foreigner and a commoner,&rdquo says Basu. &ldquoBut Victoria had none of the class snobbery of those around her, who were jealous of his relationship with the her.&rdquo

Royal physician Sir James Reid told Victoria that he had &ldquobeen questioned as to her sanity&rdquo. Victoria raged that her son Bertie &ndash later Edward VII &ndash and the Royal Household had all &ldquobehaved disgracefully&rdquo.

&ldquoShe wrote to Bertie, ordering him: &lsquoYou are to be courteous to the munshi and will respect him,&rsquo&rdquo says Basu. &ldquoVictoria enjoyed a fight and relished defending Abdul.&rdquo

Realising that Abdul may be ostracised by the Royal Household after her death, Victoria gifted him large landholdings in India. Her fears soon proved prescient. While Abdul was the last person to see her body alone when Victoria died in 1901, aged 81, at Osborne House in the Isle of Wight, and walked with the principal mourners at her funeral procession in Windsor, as the Queen feared, he was soon being victimised.


New Sutton Hoo Movie Rights the Wrongs of Archaeological Snobbery - History

Back in January, film fans were fascinated by Netflix movie The Dig’s portrayal of the real-life Sutton Hoo excavation and all the treasure discovered at the 7th century Anglo-Saxon ship’s burial site. Ralph Fiennes’ Basil Brown, who was once described as an amateur archaeologist due to being self-taught, was hired to work on what would be one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all time. And now new film Ammonite is inspired by the life of British palaeontologist Mary Anning, who similarly made incredible historical finds despite her lack of formal education in her own subject.

Born in Lyme Regis on May 21, 1799, Mary’s early life was marked by tragedy, after eight of her nine siblings died.

Growing up and living in relative poverty throughout her short life, Anning became world-famous for her Jurassic marine fossil bed discoveries in the cliffs along the English Channel at her birthplace in Dorset.

Her amazing geographical findings are some of the most important in history and their evidence contributed to big changes in scientific thought at the time regarding prehistoric life and the age of the Earth.

Incredibly, in 1811, the fossil collector and dealer was just 12-years-old when she discovered a 5.2m (17ft) skeleton, now known to be an ichthyosaur.

Later on, Anning would find the first complete skeleton of a plesiosaur, a marine reptile.

Additionally, she went on to discover the UK’s first known remains of a pterosaur, believed to be the largest-ever flying animal.

For those interested, the palaeontologist’s discoveries including the ichthyosaur, plesiosaur and pterosaur are on display in the National History Museum to this day.

Despite Anning making such ground-breaking finds, she was sadly not accepted by the scientific community in her lifetime.

Since Anning never married, and it’s unknown if she had lovers, Francis Lee’s new movie Ammonite follows a speculative romantic relationship between Winslet’s palaeontologist and Ronan’s Charlotte Murchison.

The latter was a real-life and contemporary British geologist alongside her husband Sir Roderick Murchison.

Ammonite’s synopsis reads: “In the 1840s, acclaimed self-taught palaeontologist Mary Anning works alone on the wild and brutal Southern English coastline of Lyme Regis.

“The days of her famed discoveries behind her, she now hunts for common fossils to sell to rich tourists to support herself and her ailing widowed mother.”

The synopsis continues: “When one such tourist, Roderick Murchison, arrives in Lyme on the first leg of a European tour, he entrusts Mary with the care of his young wife Charlotte, who is recuperating from a personal tragedy.

“Mary, whose life is a daily struggle on the poverty line, cannot afford to turn him down but, proud and relentlessly passionate about her work, she clashes with her unwanted guest. They are two women from utterly different worlds.

“Yet despite the chasm between their social spheres and personalities, Mary and Charlotte discover they can each offer what the other has been searching for: the realisation that they are not alone. It is the beginning of a passionate and all-consuming love affair that will defy all social bounds and alter the course of both lives irrevocably.”

Ammonite is available for premium rental at home on all digital platforms from March 26.


Sutton Hoo

Anglo-Saxons are in the news. That may be a surprise. But which Anglo-Saxons? There are three different ways of answering the question:

1. Anglo-Saxons in history
2. Anglo-Saxons in American history
3. Anglo-Saxons in the culture wars.

In this blog, I wish to examine what has been happening in the last few weeks in an amazing confluence of actions including the media coverage.

ANGLO-SAXONS IN HISTORY

In the current issue of Archaeology magazine, Laetitia La Follete, president of the Archaeological Institute of America, wrote her “From the President” column on “SUTTON HOO AND THE DIG.” Here is the opening paragraph:

Archaeology fans around the world got a treat early this year with the release of the Netflix movie The Dig. Focused on the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial in Suffolk, England, on the eve of World War II, it tells the story of Mrs. Edith Pretty, a wealthy landowner who hired the polymath and self-taught archaeologist Basil Brown to excavate the mounds on her property. Once Brown realized he had found the remains of a ship, he and Pretty brought in a “dream team” of professionals, Peggy and Stuart Piggott among them, to methodically excavate Mound 1. The magnificent Anglo-Saxon royal ship burial and its opulent treasures that the team unearthed rewrote history. The finds’ glittering artistry, sophisticated design, and evidence of far-flung trade showed that the early seventh century in Britain was no Dark Ages.

The real Anglo-Saxons were a media phenomenon complete with a Netflix movie! La Follete announced in the column that in May she had interviewed Martin Carver, who oversaw the excavations from 1983-2005 under the auspices of the British Museum, the Society of Antiquaries and the BBC. Their mission: to give the site its context. What was a ship burial doing in seventh-cenury Suffolk: Why that? Why there? Why then? The interview was online so accessible to people around the world interested in Anglo-Saxons and/or archaeology. A second online lecture will be held June 24.

By coincidence, also in May a new book on the Anglo-Saxons was published.

The Anglo-Saxons: The Making of England: 410-1066 by Marc Morris

A quest for England’s origins

Sixteen hundred years ago, Britain left the Roman Empire and fell swiftly into ruin. Into this violent and unstable world came foreign invaders from across the sea, and established themselves as its new masters. The Anglo-Saxons traces the turbulent history of these people across the next six centuries. It explains how their earliest rulers fought relentlessly against each other for glory and supremacy. It explores how they abandoned their old gods for Christianity. It is a tale of famous figures like King Offa, Alfred the Great, and Edward the Confessor, but also features a host of lesser known characters. Through their remarkable careers we see how a new society, a new culture, and a single unified nation came into being.

Notice the timeframe: roughly from King Arthur to William the Conqueror, neither of whom was Anglo-Saxon. They are reminder of the presence of Celtics and Normans in England. One should add Vikings to the ethnic stew as well.

In an interview with Olivia Waxman, Time, medievalist Mary Rambran-Olin, an expert on race in early England, noted that even the early English did not call themselves Anglo-Saxons. The term developed in the 17 th century as England wanted an origin story for its new empire.

If one has a genuine interest in Anglo-Saxons, just in the month of May there was a movie, interviews with an archaeologist and medievalist, and a new book from which to choose.

ANGLO-SAXONS IN AMERICA HISTORY

In the aftermath of the culture war Anglo-Saxons (see below), Washington Post published an article (4/26/21) by historian L.D. Burnett entitled “In the U.S, (sic) praise for Anglo-Saxon heritage has always been about white supremacy: Before the Civil War, Anglo-Saxonism was touted to defend slavery and conquest.” Burnett decries the “sinister use of Anglo-Saxonism” as nothing new. She wrote that the commingling of Anglo-Saxon blood and Anglo-Saxon tradition in the early 19 th century was done in conjunction with the purported racial and intellectual superiority of White Americans.

Burnett researched the instances of newspaper usage of the term from 1800-1830 in the digitized newspaper database. The examples were few. “But between 1831 and 1840, the number of references to ‘Anglo-Saxon’ soared.” She attributes the dramatic increase first to the need of proslavery apologists contending with the moral and political pressure from the abolitionist movement. Second, she credits the increase due to the Texas war for independence which many Americans viewed in racial terms. Combined they led to an Anglo-Saxon racial manifest destiny to dominate the continent and the hemisphere. It was at this point that the designation of an ethnic group became divorced from its history and entered into the lexicon of American White racial superiority.

There is one slight flaw with this analysis of events in the 1830s. There is one event which she did not mention that calls into question her race-based interpretation. It can be summed up in two words:

IRISH CATHOLICS

Beginning in the 1830s, America experienced a demographic deluge by a people who were not considered to be white. The reaction by the English-speaking white people already here was much like the America First Caucus today. Here is an example from Samuel Morse (“Foreign Conspiracy against the Liberties of the United States,” 1835) prior to the invention of the telegraph when the Hudson Valley was being overrun by the wrong sorts of people:

Foreign immigrants are flocking to our shores in increased numbers, two thirds at least are Roman Catholics, and of the most ignorant classes, and thus pauperism and crime are alarmingly increased. . . . The great body of emigrants to this country are the hard-working, mentally neglected poor of Catholic countries in Europe, who have left a land where they were enslaved, for one of freedom. . . .[T]hey are not fitted to act with the judgment in the political affairs of their new country, like native citizens, educated from their infancy in the principles and habits of our institutions. Most of them are too ignorant to act at all for themselves, and expect to be guided wholly by others [the priests].

Morse’s ire against a supposed great papal conspiracy was, if not a majority opinion at the time, very popular. As always, the vote was the key:

we must have the [naturalization] law so amended that no FOREIGNER WHO MAY COME INTO THIS COUNTRY, AFTER THE PASSAGE OF THE NEW LAW, SHALL EVER BE ALLOWED EXERCISE THE ELECTIVE FRANCHISE. This alone meets evil in its fullest extent.

People define themselves in opposition to the “Other.” In the United States in the 1830s, the “Other” were the Irish Catholics and the true or real Americans were the Anglo-Saxon Protestants.

Again by coincidence, in May there was a new book out on the Irish in America: The Fires of Philadelphia: Citizen-Soldiers, Nativists, and the 1844 Riots Over the Soul of a Nation by Zachary M. Schrag.

In 1844 America was in a state of deep unrest, grappling with xenophobia, racial, and ethnic tension on a national scale that feels singular to our time, but echoes the earliest anti-immigrant sentiments of the country. In that year Philadelphia was set aflame by a group of Protestant ideologues — avowed nativists — who were seeking social and political power rallied by charisma and fear of the Irish immigrant menace.

For these men, it was Irish Catholics they claimed would upend morality and murder their neighbors, steal their jobs, and overturn democracy. The nativists burned Catholic churches, chased and beat people through the streets, and exchanged shots with a militia seeking to reinstate order. In the aftermath, the public debated both the militia’s use of force and the actions of the mob. Some of the most prominent nativists continued their rise to political power for a time, even reaching Congress.

The book is an account of the moment one of America’s founding cities turned on itself over the issue of immigration.

Schrag wrote about this in a blog for HNN in May, “In 1844, Nativist Protestants Burned Churches in the Name of Religious Liberty.” The subject of the Irish including before the 1830s was a three part series in New York Almanack by John Warren. One wonders how Burnett failed to mention the Irish in her column on the 1830s and why the Washington Post failed to catch such a glaring omission.

One final observation on the use of Anglo-Saxon before turning to the America First Caucus. During congressional debate over the 1924 Immigration Act, Senator Ellison DuRant Smith of South Carolina, said the following:

Thank God we have in America perhaps the largest percentage of any country in the world of the pure, unadulterated Anglo-Saxon stock certainly the greatest of any nation in the Nordic breed. It is for the preservation of that splendid stock that has characterized us that I would make this not an asylum for the oppressed of all countries, but a country to assimilate and perfect that splendid type of manhood that has made America the foremost Nation in her progress and in her power, and yet the youngest of all the nations.

In this immigration debate, Africans in America were not the issue. The Irish in America were not the issue either anymore. Instead the demographic deluge that was feared mainly was the people called ethnics from southern and eastern Europe. They were the new “Other” to be feared as Adam Server, The Atlantic, wrote:

Nativists needed a way to explain why these immigrants—Polish, Russian, Greek, Italian, and Jewish—were distinct from earlier generations, and why their presence posed a danger.

AMERICA FIRST CAUCUS

Now we turn to the media sensation that launched the Anglo-Saxon “15 minutes” of media coverage, the America First Caucus. There are three obvious reasons why the simple-minded Anglo-Saxon Caucus was doomed from the start:

Kevin McCarthy
Rudy Giuliani
Jared Kushner.

Did you hear the one about an Irish, Italian, and Jew who attended an America First Caucus? Perhaps one should add Sean Hannity to the list.

True, identity politics includes white people, too, but even a shred of thinking would have revealed the fallacy of this particular effort. In addition at the very moment Democrats are finally starting to realize that they do not have a monopoly on the vote of non-European immigrants and that these people do not necessarily accept the all-race all-the-time emphasis of the Woke, the America First Caucus is politically counterproductive.

In summary, one cannot help but notice the differing coverages of the current Anglo-Saxon contretemps. One could choose from new books by scholars on the topic or watch a movie/interview. One could read responsible articles in Atlantic and Time about Anglo-Saxons in America. Or one could partake a politically-corrected view of history in the Washington Post.

Bonus question: One hundred years from on a history test you are asked to explain why American nativists were not Native Americans without laughing. What would you write?


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